Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Indigenous peoples worldwide have a vital role in addressing climate change

Indigenous peoples have not been involved in discussions about climate change in most countries said Henrietta Marrie, a Aboriginal leader of the Gimuy-Walubarra Yidinji Nation of Cairns. Indigenous and local peoples collectively represent more than a billion people 

The IPCC and United Nations University (UNU)  have organized this week’s main workshop to incorporate and “credibly validate” indigenous people’s traditional knowledge

Indigenous Peoples Needed to Meet the Challenge of Climate Change (includes VIDEO)National Geographic,  by Stephen Leahy, March 25, 2012 “Planning is not part of our culture. You just get up in the morning and do what you need to do for the day,” said Marilyn Wallace of the Kuku Nyungka ‘mob’ (aboriginal nation) in northern Queensland, Australia.

“Bama” or caring for their local territory is an important part of aboriginal culture and identity Wallace told participants at a mini-workshop in Cairns, Australia today Sunday March 25th prior to the start of the main workshop Climate Change Mitigation with Local Communities and Indigenous peoples  on Monday.

Caring for the land includes monitoring the impacts of climate change and using traditional knowledge to keep or sequester carbon she said.
Indigenous peoples and local communities are the least responsible for climate-altering emissions of carbon but they can play an important role helping to reduce emissions through the way they manage their lands.

However Indigenous peoples have not been involved in discussions about climate change in most countries said Henrietta Marrie, a Aboriginal leader of the Gimuy-Walubarra Yidinji Nation of Cairns. Indigenous and
local peoples collectively represent more than a billion people said Marrie, organizer of Sunday’s workshop and a representative of The Christensen Fund, a US-based private foundation with a program in northern Australia.

“In Australia Indigenous peoples have legal rights to sixteen percent
of the continent and own and manage 25 percent of the protected lands
here,” Marrie said.

There are many reasons why the voices of indigenous people go unheard
including historical, political and practical reasons like the simple
fact they often live in remote areas she said. Another is the fact
their views and experiences are rarely reflected in the technical
reports in scientific journals.
“We know wider knowledge exists about what is happening on the
ground,” said Youba Sokona, a climate expert from the African nation
of Mali. Sokona is a co-chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on
Climate Change (IPCC)  working group that will report on ways carbon
emissions can be reduced.

The IPCC is the world authority on climate change. Countries take the
IPCC’s policy-relevant recommendations very seriously since it
represents the best and most credible science. The IPCC does not do
climate research, it only reviews and assesses the quality of existing
research found in peer-reviewed technical or scientific journals.

The IPCC and United Nations University (UNU)  have organized this week’s main workshop to incorporate and “credibly validate” indigenous people’s traditional knowledge Sokona said. This also needs to be done
in a fair and equitable way……
http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2012/03/25/indigenous-peoples-needed-to-meet-the-challenge-of-climate-change/

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March 27, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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