Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

91 Year Old Prisoner of War Hero, Tom Uren, launches Hiroshima Exhibition

He had spent three years as a prisoner of the Japanese, forced to work on the Burma-Thai death railway before being shipped to Japan to labour in copper and lead smelters. He was in a camp at Omura, about 60 kilometres from Nagasaki, when the sky discoloured.

”As I got to understand nuclear war and the nuclear industry I realised the dropping of those bombs on Japan was a crime against humanity,” he says.

he will bring his anti-nuclear message to Melbourne tomorrow when he launches Hiroshima, assembled by the
Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Exhibition Abroad  at the Gasworks Arts Park in Albert Park

At 91, peacemaker still fights nuclear threat The Age October 8, 2012 Tony Wright National affairs editor   TOM Uren is 91 now, but he retains a vivid memory of the sky turning crimson when the ”Fat Man” atomic bomb exploded over the Japanese city of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945. ”I’ve seen the most beautiful sunsets in the Northern Territory, but
this was a magnification of one of those sunsets by about 20 times,” he says.
Mr Uren had no idea that he was witnessing the second use of an atomic bomb in world warfare, or that it killed 39,000 people instantly and wounded another 25,000, with many more to perish of blast burns and radiation exposure.
He and his fellow prisoners of war were simply overjoyed that, in the
days after the sky turned crimson, the Japanese surrendered and they
were rescued from enslavement.
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”We didn’t care how the war ended – we were just happy it was over,”
Mr Uren says. He had spent three years as a prisoner of the Japanese, forced to work on the Burma-Thai death railway before being shipped to Japan to labour in copper and lead smelters. He was in a camp at Omura, about 60 kilometres from Nagasaki, when the sky discoloured.
But Mr Uren, who went on to become a Labor MP for 32 years and served
as a minister in the Whitlam and Hawke governments, also became one of
Australia’s most passionate anti-nuclear and peace activists.
”As I got to understand nuclear war and the nuclear industry I realised the dropping of those bombs on Japan was a crime against humanity,” he says. ”My old POW mates wouldn’t agree with me, of
course.”
All these years later, he will bring his anti-nuclear message to
Melbourne tomorrow when he launches Hiroshima, assembled by the
Hiroshima-Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Exhibition Abroad.
The exhibition of artefacts, photographs and documentaries from the
bombed cities will be on display at the Gasworks Arts Park in Albert
Park for three weeks before going to Adelaide.
It is being set up by the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear
Weapons, and Mr Uren hopes it will remind those who attend of the
danger he believes the nuclear industry poses.
”I’m not a dogmatist,” he says, ”but every nuclear power station on
the planet is an agent of death, threatening to contaminate all
around.”……. http://www.theage.com.au/victoria/at-91-peacemaker-still-fights-nuclear-threat-20121007-277bw.html#ixzz28jQWhxNS

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October 7, 2012 - Posted by | General News

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