Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Event details

This page provides information on recent action notices as they become available

 

Please consider making a submission to a federal parliamentary inquiry regarding the draft Australia-India nuclear cooperation agreement. Below and attached is a pro-forma submission which you can email (either in the body of an email or as an attachment). Feel free to add further comments. Don’t forget to add your name at the end!

 

Email submission to: jsct@aph.gov.au

Deadline for submissions: Friday November 28  (though later submissions are likely to be accepted)
SUBMISSION REGARDING DRAFT AUSTRALIA-INDIA NUCLEAR COOPERATION AGREEMENT

 

To: Committee Secretary, Joint Standing Committee on Treaties
PO Box 6021, Parliament House, Canberra ACT 2600
Email: jsct@aph.gov.au

 

I oppose the draft Australia-India nuclear cooperation agreement for the following reasons:

 

The draft agreement is inconsistent with long-standing bipartisan policy of prohibiting uranium exports to countries which have not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT). India continues to expand its nuclear weapons arsenal and its missile capabilities, yet  there is no requirement in the draft agreement for India to in any way curb its nuclear weapons program. For example there is no requirement for India to sign and ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty.

 

The precedent set by nuclear trade with India increases the risk of other countries pulling out of the NPT, building nuclear weapons, and doing so with the expectation that civil nuclear trade would continue given the Indian precedent.

 

Already, the US-India nuclear agreement has had adverse consequences − legitimising China’s nuclear cooperation with Pakistan. Pakistan is well aware of the potential for ‘civil’ nuclear trade to facilitate an expansion of India’s arsenal of nuclear weapons. In 2006, Pakistan’s National Command Authority (NCA) declared that: “In view of the fact the [US-India] agreement would enable India to produce a significant quantity of fissile material and nuclear weapons from unsafeguarded nuclear reactors, the NCA expressed firm resolve that our credible minimum deterrence requirements will be met.”

 

The draft agreement has been strongly criticised by John Carlson, the former Director-General of the Australian Safeguards and Non-Proliferation Office.[1] Mr Carlson notes that the draft agreement contains “substantial departures from Australia’s current safeguards conditions” which suggest “that Australia may be unable to keep track of what happens to uranium supplied to India.”

 

Mr Carlson notes that the ‘administrative arrangement’ which will append the nuclear cooperation agreement may be “even more consequential than the agreement itself” as it sets out the working procedures for the agreement. But the administrative arrangement is a work in progress. It would be inappropriate and irresponsible for the Joint Standing Committee on Treaties to endorse the draft agreement until such time as a robust administrative arrangement is in place and has been reviewed by the Committee and has been publicly released.

 

International Atomic Energy Safeguards inspections in India cover only part of India’s ‘civil’ nuclear program. Inspections are partial and periodic and provide no confidence that ostensibly peaceful nuclear facilities and materials will not be used for weapons production. Information about safeguards in India comes almost entirely from leaked documents. The IAEA provides no country-specific information on the number and nature of safeguards inspections carried out in India.

 

Even if strict safeguards were in place, uranium sales to India would create an intractable problem: uranium exports freeing up India’s domestic reserves for weapons production. K. Subrahmanyam, former head of the India’s National Security Advisory Board, has said that: “Given India’s uranium ore crunch and the need to build up our minimum credible nuclear deterrent arsenal as fast as possible, it is to India’s advantage to categorise as many power reactors as possible as civilian ones to be refuelled by imported uranium and conserve our native uranium fuel for weapons-grade plutonium production.”

 

India’s Public Accounts Committee said in a 2013 report that the country’s nuclear safety regime is “fraught with grave risks” and that the nuclear regulator is weak and under-resourced. In 2012, India’s Auditor-General found that 60% of safety inspections for operating nuclear power plants were either delayed or not undertaken at all.

 

Claims of significant export revenue from uranium exports to India ignore readily-available facts. According to the World Nuclear Association, India’s uranium demand in 2014 will amount to just 913 tonnes – just 1.4% of world demand. If Australia supplies 20% of that demand, uranium export revenue will increase by 3%. Likewise, claims that the nuclear cooperation agreement will indirectly boost bilateral trade by fostering trust and goodwill ignore readily-available facts. Bilateral trade grew from $3.3 billion at the turn of the century to more than $20 billion in 2011, despite Australia’s ban on uranium exports to India and other countries that have not signed the NPT. Since the uranium policy was overturned in 2011, bilateral trade has gone backwards and now stands at $15 billion.

 

The alleged greenhouse ‘benefits’ of nuclear trade with India would at most be minuscule and rest on the arbitrary assumption that nuclear power displaces more greenhouse-intensive energy sources. There are much safer ways to help India curb greenhouse emissions than encouraging an expansion of nuclear power. For example, Leonard Weiss, a former staff director of the US Senate Subcommittee on Energy and Nuclear Proliferation, notes that a program of improved energy efficiency could substitute for all the future power output from nuclear reactors currently being planned in India between now and 2020.[2]

 

Australia should help India develop its massive renewable energy potential [3] rather than supporting India’s dangerous, poorly-regulated nuclear power sector and worsening WMD proliferation risks in the process.

 

Name:

Address:

Email:

Date:

 

[1] www.foe.org.a/carlson

[2] Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, May/June 2006

[3] www.wwfindia.org/news_facts/?10261

__._,_.___

View attachments on the web

 

 

 

We have never asked for donations to Antinuclear, and we’re not doing so now.

However, we’re just very keen to support Frontline Films  David Bradbury is an Australian film-maker who has earned an international reputation as a film maker willing to go to extraordinary lengths for a cause, exposing political oppression and environmental vandalism.

Bradbury has won many international film festival prizes, received five Australian Film Industry awards, and two Academy Award nominations.

He is currently producing a very up to date film on the situation of nuclear power – globally. Bradbury’s Frontline Films nevertheless runs on the proverbiial shoe string – and with little encouragement from the mainstream media.

We believe that Frontline Film’s newest documentary will be a remarkable and eye-opening film. But David Bradbury needs funds to get these filmed events and interviews edited, and onto DVD and film. And then – to get this – the most up to date film about the global nuclear scene to the  2nd International Uranium Film Festival of Rio de Janeiro 28. June – 14. July 2012.

So – we’re calling for  donations. The Frontline Film Foundation  is a registered charity and has tax deductible status. All you need is these  banking details:
Frontline Film Foundation
Southern Cross Credit Union
BSB: 802-185
A/C #: 86527

For more information – go to http://www.frontlinefilmfoundation.org/index.htm

 

 

 

8 Comments »

  1. […] *April 2 – Perth – Western Australian Nuclear Free Alliance (WANFA) – Community Voices: more info at Action Australia « Antinuclear &#1072nd at Event details « Antinuclear […]

    Pingback by Uranium deception and confusion of Northern Territory politician « Antinuclear | Mesothelioma Attorneys | March 13, 2011 | Reply

  2. October 1st. Public information and awareness protest/rally/event in Cobar Western NSW. Watch for the Steam-punk Wombles – powered by Cobar Anti-nuclear facebook group.

    Comment by Flora Florance | September 26, 2011 | Reply

  3. Hi, Feel free to post any of your planned events on this page!
    In fact, we are look for more admins to help manage it. If interested contact me or the other admins of the page!
    “Like this page to say ‘No’ to Australian exports of uranium”

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Like-this-page-to-say-No-to-Australian-exports-of-uranium/220062144730266

    Comment by Andrew Hayward-Bannister | November 23, 2011 | Reply

  4. We MUST PROTEST the placement / displacement of Nuclear Material anywhere so as to prevent a major nuclear mishap from happening on our shores or in outback.

    Just a few days ago (May 2012), in northeast North America, a nuclear submarine fire almost completely contaminated one of the most famous and once pristine clear fresh waters off Maine, the area having a coast with some of the best lobsters and other marine life in the world.

    If such an event occurred off an Austalian coast, we would have to kick ourselves in the butt for years and years for ever allowing such a terrible tragedy to occur. And if such an event occurred inside an Australian port, it would potentially close the port for many hundreds of years, similar to Fukushima Japan.

    Reference:
    Nuclear Submarine Disaster Wikipedia

    CLOSE EINSTEIN MINE !
    NO FRANK EINSTEIN MONSTER !

    Comment by NoNukes | May 28, 2012 | Reply

  5. We MUST PROTEST the placement / displacement of Nuclear Material anywhere so as to prevent a major nuclear mishap from happening on our shores or in the outback.

    Just a few days ago (May 2012), in northeast North America, a nuclear submarine fire almost completely contaminated one of the most famous and once pristine clear fresh waters off Maine, the area having a coast with some of the best lobsters and other marine life in the world.

    If such an event occurred off an Austalian coast, we would have to kick ourselves in the butt for years and years for ever allowing such a terrible tragedy to occur. And if such an event occurred inside an Australian port, it would potentially close the port for many hundreds of years, similar to Fukushima Japan.

    Reference:
    Nuclear Submarine Disaster Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Miami_(SSN-755)

    CLOSE EINSTEIN MINE !
    NO FRANK EINSTEIN MONSTER !

    Comment by NoNukes | May 28, 2012 | Reply

  6. Please share information about our Sydney event planned for 10th March 2013
    To all friends – Everyone is invited to this great event we have planned in 2 weeks’ time. Come & enjoy great music & food while learning what’s been happening in Japan in the 2 years since Fukushima. The fabulous Natalie Pa’apa’a of Blue King Brown playing acoustic, Indigenous dance, taiko drumming, and more! Japanese & local speakers. $10 donation. Would love to see you there :) Please share!

    https://www.facebook.com/events/502330286475902/

    Comment by Kerry Laws | March 2, 2013 | Reply

  7. Hi all.I’m a parent of 3, 2 whom attend Hurstbridge Learning Co-op (a parent-run co-op school of under 30 primary school aged students) My 2 youngest are indigenous and I read of this tour group through Koori

    Comment by saara marlo-monten | March 27, 2013 | Reply

  8. ……cont..from last post.. Koori Mail. Is there a possibility for our school to be visited or be involved in any way? I believe this would be of great benefit both ways as thereis a great like-minded community out here that would be happy to support. Best of luck with the tour!

    Comment by saara marlo-monten | March 27, 2013 | Reply


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