Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Solar battery hybrid storage system for Muswellbrook, New South Wales

Parkinson-Report-Photon to build solar plus storage unit for NSW broadcast tower REneweconmy, By  on 15 July 2014  German-based solar group Photon Energy is to install a large scale solar plus battery storage hybrid power system at a telecommunications tower in New South Wales that it says could be the fore-runner of thousands of such installations across the country.

The system, to be installed at a broadcast tower operated by BAI near Muswellbrook, will provide 24/7 power through a 39kW solar array and a 215kWh battery storage installation. An 8kW diesel generator will provide standby in emergencies.

Photon Energy says once successfully tested the concept could be implemented on thousands of sites across Australia.

Michael Gartner, the head of Photon Energy‘s Australian operations, said the project was a great step forward“ for solar power to provide clean and economically viable power supply for remote sites.

“The potential for solar PV in the replacement of conventional energy sources is substantial and will bring cost benefits and emissions savings for Australia in the coming years and decades.“

“… We can show how to incorporate solar PV into any given energy system and prove that using abundant sunlight for your own power consumption is the way forward.”……..http://reneweconomy.com.au/2014/photon-build-solar-plus-storage-nsw-broadcast-tower-37262

July 21, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Sydney gets world’s first solar integrated house

sunWorld’s first building-integrated solar system built in Australia http://ecomento.com/2014/07/08/worlds-first-building-integrated-solar-system-built-in-australia/ July 8, 2014 –  Many people looking to go (at least partially) off the grid install rooftop solar panels, but a house purpose-built for solar power is another matter entirely.

The first building-integrated solar energy system was recently installed in a house in suburban Sydney, Australia, CleanTechnica reports.

The house’s rooftop array thin-film photovoltaic panels with a solar-thermal duct system that warms and cools the air. While the top layer produces electricity like any other solar panel, heat trapped between the layers is also used by the house.

Australian steel manufacturer Bluescope produced the $5 million system with government assistance in the form of a $3.2 million loan grant from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Government money is often an important factor in getting projects like this off the ground (no pun intended).

Whether integrated solar catches on remains to be seen, but at least the public will now get a chance to see what this technology can do. This post appeared first on NextPremium.com

July 9, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council stopped proposed Wallarah 2 longwall coal mine

judge-1Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council did what the O’Farrell and Baird Governments were averse to doing – it stopped the proposed Wallarah 2 longwall coal mine in its tracks, North Coast Voices, 13 June 14 Early in 2014 the Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Council took Wyong Coal Pty Ltd (First Respondent), Minister for Planning and Infrastructure (Second Respondent),Planning Assessment Commission NSW (Third Respondent) and  NSW Aboriginal Land Council (Fourth Respondent) to the NSW Land & Environment Court.

The judgment does not appear to have been published yet.

However, The Daily Telegraph reported on 13 June 2014:

THE controversial Wallarah 2 coal mine, which ICAC target Nick Di Girolamo lobbied for on behalf of Korean mining company Kores, has been put on hold and may never go ahead after a Land and Environment Court decision.

The decision was a win for the local Aboriginal Land Council, which had fought the mine on its land.

Planning Minister Pru Goward made clear last night she would not intervene in the matter, releasing a statement saying: “I have considered the judgment and I accept the decision of the court.”….

The proposed Wallarah 2 longwall coal mine put forward by the Korean-owned mining company Kores Australia Pty Ltd and, its joint venture partners Catherine Hill Resources Pty Ltd, Kyungdong Australia Pty Ltd, SK Networks Resources Australia (Wyong) Pty Ltd, SK Networks Resources Pty Ltd and progressed by Wyong Coal Pty Ltd (T/A Wyong Areas Coal Joint Venture), had already failed basic environmental and risk management standards as the 4 June 2014 NSW Planning and Assessment Commission Final Report summary indicates:…..http://northcoastvoices.blogspot.com.au/2014/06/darkinjung-local-aboriginal-land.html

June 14, 2014 Posted by | aboriginal issues, legal, New South Wales | Leave a comment

CSIRO’s breakthrough Solar Steam technology

sunSupercritical Solar Steam Could Rival Fossil Fuels http://www.energymatters.com.au/index.php?main_page=news_article&article_id=4338 10 June 14 A breakthrough by CSIRO scientists could see solar energy replace fossil fuels in the most advanced power stations in the world.  A research program at the CSIRO Energy Centre in Newcastle focused on using solar power to create supercritical steam – super-hot, pressurised steam – to drive electric turbines in large-scale power plant.

The CSIRO team broke a world record for heating and pressurising steam using only solar thermal power in May. The work has been hailed as a coup for the renewable energy industry. Previously, only coal or gas-fired plants could achieve temperatures high enough generate supercritical steam.

Conventional solar thermal power plants currently generate subcritical steam – but CSIRO believes if these plants could be converted to supercritical steam power, the overall cost of solar electricity would be significantly lowered.  “It’s like breaking the sound barrier; this step change proves solar has the potential to compete with the peak performance capabilities of fossil fuel sources,” said CSIRO Energy Director, Dr Alex Wonhas.

“Instead of relying on burning fossil fuels to produce supercritical steam, this breakthrough demonstrates that the power plants of the future could instead be using the free, zero emission energy of the sun to achieve the same result.”
Researchers used CSIRO’s test solar thermal plant in Newcastle to break the world record for solar steam, reaching temperatures of 570 degrees Celsius, at a pressure of 23.5 megapascals (a measure of force per unit area). It is this combination of enormous pressure and heat that makes the breakthrough such an important milestone for solar technology.

The CSIRO says the breakthrough was made possible through a $5.68 million research program supported by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) and collaboration with researchers from solar thermal giant, Abengoa Solar.
ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht said that while work remained before supercritical solar steam technology would rival fossil fuels, “This breakthrough brings solar thermal energy a step closer to cost competitiveness with fossil fuel generated power.”
Source

June 10, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Coalition Ministers say that Moree solar energy plant funding is assured

westmill-solar-park-cooperaMoree solar on track for Commonwealth funding http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-04/moree-solar-on-track/5500668 By Tim Lamacraft 4 Jun 2014,The Federal Coalition is confident the Moree Solar Farm will secure Commonwealth funding despite plans to axe its finance source.

The Government is looking to axe the Australian Renewable Energy Association, which has expressed interest in providing finance to the Moree Solar Farm, a joint initiative of Pacific Hydro and Fotowatio.

The two companies are nervous that tens-of-millions of dollars in funding is in jeopardy.

But Federal Parkes MP Mark Coulton recently met with Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane on the issue.

He says the Moree Solar Farm is on track to meet Commonwealth funding approvals.

“I’ve been reassured by the Minister and his Department that there’s nothing with this project that’s ringing alarm bells and they’re very happy with it the way it is,” he said.

“Certainly the Moree Solar Farm has no reason at this stage to be fearful that the ARENA funding wont be there.”

It’s not yet clear when the Coalition will approach the Senate in an attempt to repeal the Arena Act, but projects that do not already have agreements in place will not be funded.

June 5, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Aboriginal art exhibition “Flow of Voices” highlights environment and history

Aboriginal elders paint pre-mine tragedy GINA FAIRLEY Visual Arts Hub,  3 JUNE, 2014
A new exhibition from remote mining country provides a ‘prequel’ tale that goes back to colonial frontier massacres Jacky Green’s potent pictures of the environmental impact of the Macarthur River Mine’s (MRM) on the remote Gulf Country of Borroloola recently offered a powerful example of the way art tells an important contemporary story.

But the region, which sits just below the Gulf of Carpentaria in the Northern Territory, has an equally charged story of land and dispossession from colonial times which is now the subject of a  matching exhibition Flow of Voices 2: Stewart Hoosan and Nancy McDinny……….in this unrecognised frontier war about one-sixth of the population lost their lives in lawless massacres and violence (600 men, women and children in official records),’ said Cross Arts Projects director Jo Holder.

‘Nancy McDinny and Stewart Hoosan insist that the settlement of Australia wasn’t a simple story of Aboriginal people acquiescing to the occupation of their land, but one of resistance where many people fought back against violence, sexual abuse and dispossession’, Holder added in a statement.

‘When they were powerful old people, didn’t know how to speak English but used to talk in language, saying, “We not going to give away our land. This is our land. It belong here. This is our history, our story and our dreaming”,’ said McDinny.

The old people who set up Waralungku art centre – including McDinny, Hoosan and the late Ginger Riley (from Ngukkur) – wanted to make history paintings to account for their peoples’ agency and overwhelming belief in their just claim on their land. Renowned for their colour and realism, ‘many paintings from the Gulf are unique conceptual and analytic documents about history and contemporary issues,’ explained Holder………The partner exhibitions ‘argue for proper consultation, environmental monitoring, restoration and community benefit in exchange for resource extraction. Without proper respect for people and country racial hierarchies and “imperial” attitudes persist,’ said gallery director Jo Holder.

Green’s work captures that sentiment: ‘I want to show people what is happening to our country and to Aboriginal people. No one is listening to us. What we want. How we want to live. What we want in the future for our children. It’s for these reasons that I started to paint. I want government to listen to Aboriginal people. I want people in the cities to know what’s happening to us and our country.’

The artists and Waralungku Arts are proud to announce their plan to found a Yanyuwa, Garrwa, Marra and Gudanji People’s Keeping Place and Knowledge Centre at Borroloola.

Flow of Voices 2:
Cross Art Projects, Kings Cross
22 May – 28 June 2, 2014
www.crossarts.com.au
www.waralungku.com        http://visual.artshub.com.au/news-article/news/visual-arts/aboriginal-elders-paint-pre-mine-tragedy-244014

June 5, 2014 Posted by | aboriginal issues, media, New South Wales | Leave a comment

Solar thermal energy a step closer with CSIRO breakthrough

CSIRO Newcastle solar breakthrough for supercritical steam ABC News 3 June 14 The CSIRO is describing research at its Newcastle energy centre as a game-changer for the renewable energy industry. The CSIRO is describing research at its Newcastle energy centre as a game-changer for the renewable energy industry.

Researchers have used solar energy to generate hot and pressurised ‘supercritical’ steam at the highest temperatures ever achieved outside of fossil sources.

Supercritical solar steam is water pressurised at enormous force and heated using solar radiation.

Around 90 per cent of Australia’s electricity is generated using fossil fuel, but only a small number of power stations are based on the more advanced supercritical steam.

The world record set at the CSIRO’s Energy Centre in Newcastle this month, was at a pressure of 23.5 megapascals and temperatures up to 570 degrees Celsius.

Project leader, Robbie McNaughton says it is the combination of pressure and temperature demonstrated at scale, that makes it such a breakthrough for solar power…… CSIRO’s Energy Director, Dr Alex Wonhas says the milestone is a game-changer for the industry.

“It’s like breaking the sound barrier,” he said.

“This step change proves solar has the potential to compete with the peak performance capabilities of fossil fuel sources.”

The $9.7 million research program is supported by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA).

ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht says although more work is needed before the technology is ready for commercialisation, it is an important breakthrough and demonstrates the importance of research and development.

Mr Frischknecht says it brings solar thermal energy a step closer to cost competitiveness with fossil fuel generated power.http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-06-03/csiro-newcastle-solar-breakthrough-for-supercritical-steam/5495744?&section=news

June 3, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Aboriginal culture preserved and shared along New South Wales far South Coast

Bundian Way preserves and shares Aboriginal culture By Bill Brown , ABC News 2 June 14 An ancient pathway travelled for thousands of years by Aboriginal people is being resurrected to save the culture of the Aboriginal people of the New South Wales far south coast. The Aboriginal people of the region were among the first to be decimated by the arrival of Europeans, beginning with sealers in the early 1800s. Now little remains of their traditions and language. So, how does an old track provide a solution for such a huge problem that has been unfolding for over 200 years?

In the 1840s Ben Boyd, as he was developing a settlement on Eden’s Twofold Bay, wanted to see some of his vast land holdings on the Monaro.

He needed to find a way up from the coast to the high country and it was Aboriginal people who showed him how to get there along the Bundian Way.

The 265km track had for generations connected Bilgalera (which non-Aboriginal people now called Fisheries Beach) with Targangal (now called Mt Kosciuszko).

Ben Boyd, with a young artist, Oswald Brierly, were guided to the high country by a young Aboriginal man, Budginbro, on horseback from the coast, along river flats and over some of the wildest and most rugged and beautiful parts of Australia.

For a large part of the journey they travelled along the Bundian Way and deviated along connected pathways.

The pathway has been surveyed and is now being rehabilitated, section by section, to be opened again for walkers, both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal, as a shared history experience celebrating that first joint expedition.

It’s a shared history which encapsulates the heritage of the early settlers and the heritage of our people who were here for many generations before the settlers came,” said Aboriginal elder Ossie Cruse as we spoke at the community’s Keeping Place………

Aboriginal work teams are currently clearing the pathway around Twofold Bay, a stunning walk around the undeveloped shoreline, little changed from Boyd’s time.

Above a beautiful beach on Eden’s Twofold Bay and looking across to the tree lined southern and eastern shores the Bundian Way project manager Noel Whittem says that the walk will emerge as a major tourist attraction especially for the visitors arriving on the cruise ships that are increasingly visiting the picturesque harbour, and where a new wharf is to be built.

The full 265km track he says will also be an attraction for bushwalkers and for those walkers who travel the world to walk ancient cultural heritage roads and tracks.

The Bundian Way is one that would predate most and tells a poignant story of the two cultures.

“We have people who want to walk the Bundian Way already.”

See the related audio for a fascinating insight into the Bundian Way project as we journey from Twofold Bay to the Keeping Place with Noel Whittem, Franz Peters, and Ossie Cruse. http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2014/06/02/4017106.htm

June 3, 2014 Posted by | aboriginal issues, New South Wales | Leave a comment

Secret agents hired to spy on anti-coal activists in New South Wales

secret-agent-AustUndercover: Spies hired to infiltrate anti-coal campaign The Age, June 1, 2014  Tom Allard National Affairs Editor Former soldiers and intelligence operatives have been sent to infiltrate a network of anti-coal protesters aiming to thwart a multibillion dollar expansion of coal production in northern NSW. Using false identities, the spies-for-hire have attempted to penetrate the inner sanctum of a group of environmentalists and local landowners who have vigorously attempted to stop the coalmines at Maules Creek and Boggabri.

In what represents a significant escalation of a heated battle between Whitehaven Coal and Idemitsu Australia Resources and anti-coal activists, a Fairfax Media investigation has uncovered a clandestine campaign of significant scale but ham-fisted execution.

Several undercover agents were discovered by the activists, including one alleged spy Marnie Tisot, who was confronted on camera. The operation raises questions of its legality given the outright deception to disrupt protest movements.

Fairfax has interviewed individuals directly involved in the espionage and multiple sources with detailed inside knowledge of the surveillance have independently alleged it was orchestrated by a company run by a former Australian military intelligence officer, Tony Groves, and his partner, Maria Topia. While their firm, the Centre for Intelligence and Risk Management, had direct operational responsibility for the espionage, it is only one link in a chain of companies believed to be involved.

Who the ultimate client was remains a mystery. Spies in the field were not told, although it was clear the Centre for Intelligence and Risk Management was acting for another party or parties.

Several leading corporations and prominent Australians are also involved in the coal expansion in northern NSW and the security operations that protect them……. http://www.theage.com.au/national/undercover-spies-hired-to-infiltrate-anticoal-campaign-20140601-39ci6.html

June 2, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, secrets and lies | Leave a comment

New South Wales Premier Baird backs Renewable Energy Target, in defiance of Federal Liberals

ballot-boxSmMike Baird gives backing for renewable energy target, SMH,  ENVIRONMENT EDITOR, THE SYDNEY MORNING HERALD  May 29, 2014  The NSW government has broken ranks with conservative counterparts in Canberra and the other states by declaring its strong support for the national renewable energy target.

Unlike other Coalition leaders, including Prime Minister Tony Abbott, Mike Baird makes clear in his government’s submission to the federal RET review that renewable energy benefits consumers, helps energy security by diversifying sources and cuts greenhouse gas emissions.

The NSW submission notes the fixed target – now at 41,000 gigawatt-hours of clean energy sources by 2020 – last year cost households in the state about $40. That sum, though, was offset by the effect renewable energy had on driving down wholesale electricity prices, the report said. ”The RET is good for NSW consumers and households – it ultimately saves money,” said Amy Kean, the state’s renewable energy advocate, who helped prepare the submission

The state also has a lot of jobs and investment at stake – some 8395 megawatts of capacity worth about $13 billion are ”progressing through the planning system”, the report said……….

The submission says projects that have met certain conditions – such as having progressed to a financial close by a particular date – could be given special consideration in any reformed RET, ”given the significant amount of effort that has already been expended in good faith”. Further reviews should also be held only every five years to bolster certainty, the NSW government said.

Analysts such as Hugh Saddler at Pitt & Sherry warn that any tinkering of the target is likely to stall new investments.

”The problem about postponing to an undefined date [is it] makes it uncertain again as to when the investments will be required,” he said. ”Once you get away from a fixed amount of gigawatt-hours in a fixed year, you’re immediately bringing back uncertainty because it depends on demand growth.”

The declaration of support is likely to be welcomed by an industry which has few outspoken supporters in conservative ranks.

Mr Baird’s predecessor, Barry O’Farrell, did not make a submission to the previous RET review less than two years ago, and was no fan of wind farms.   http://www.smh.com.au/environment/climate-change/mike-baird-gives-backing-for-renewable-energy-target-20140528-394ri.html#ixzz33Fp4KnBR

May 30, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, politics | Leave a comment

New South Wales Greens introduce Bill to promote renewable energy to benefit Hunter Valley

greensSmThe Greens say renewable energy bill will benefit the Hunter http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-05-30/the-greens-say-renewable-energy-bill-will-benefit-the-hunter/5488224 The New South Wales Greens are confident new jobs will be created in the Hunter Valley if state MPs back its legislation to transform the energy sector.  The party has seized on the Baird Government’s support for the national renewable energy target with a Bill calling for at least one 500 megawatt coal fired electricity generating unit to be shut down by 2017.

It also wants sensible, science-based wind farm planning guidelines introduced.

Green’s energy spokesman John Kaye says the move away from coal fired base load power will not hurt the Hunter.”There’s a whole lot of studies out there that show pushing up the renewable energy target, moving out of coal into wind, bring three or four times the number of jobs that already exist,” he said. “We can create new jobs, high quality jobs, unionised jobs in the wind industry, in the solar industry that will more than compensate for any loss of jobs in the coal industry.”

Plans for two Upper Hunter wind farms could benefit from the Greens push to make renewable energy a bigger part of the state’s energy mix.Scone’s Kyoto Energy Park is already approved while planning continues on the proposed Liverpool Range Wind Farm.

Mr Kaye says the government should support his party’s legislation. “What the Baird government is going to do to remove the barriers for renewable energy, what they’re going to encourage public and private investment,” he said. “Hopefully Mike Baird is turning a corner, he’s taking his government to new days where some of these Hunter wind farms can go ahead.”

May 30, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, politics | Leave a comment

St George & Sutherland Shire relieved that radioactive trash will go from their area to Northern Territory

Oscar-wastesFederal Budget 2014: Radioactive waste funding relief St George & Sutherland Shire Leader May 17, 2014 THE federal budget provides $22.6 million to develop detailed design options for a national radioactive waste management site at a location outside Sutherland Shire.

This is the first firm indication that the Coalition government will press ahead with plans for a permanent nuclear waste storage.

It is expected to be welcomed by Sutherland Shire Council, which opposes plans for a temporary storage site to be built at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) at Lucas Heights.

It is thought the federal government is considering several sites in the Northern Territory……The allocation of $22.6 million over three years for the design of the permanent nuclear storage site comes under the federal Department of Industry budget.

ANSTO also received a $654 million, four-year funding allocation under the budget.

This includes $76.6 million over five years for the OPAL reactor at Lucas Heights — Australia’s only nuclear research reactor…….http://www.theleader.com.au/story/2282157/federal-budget-2014-radioactive-waste-funding-relief/?cs=1255

May 17, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, wastes | Leave a comment

Sydney shows the way – communities can switch to clean renewable energy

text-community-energy

The City of Sydney has recognised the potential of community energy in its roadmap to move the city towards 100 per cent renewable energy by 2030. Sydney’s Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the IPCC’s most recent report has again underlined the extreme urgency of action on . “Addressing climate change will require action at all levels. Empowering communities to develop their own local, renewable energy projects will help deliver more clean energy,” Cr Moore said.

Communities can drive urgent switch to clean energy http://phys.org/news/2014-04-urgent-energy.html  Apr 22, 2014 Australia will continue to lag behind countries like the United States and Germany in heeding the UN’s latest call to urgently switch to clean sources of energy unless the burgeoning community energy sector is allowed to thrive, according to a UTS researcher. Community-owned renewable energy generation in towns and cities around the country can stimulate regional development, provide more resilient and inexpensive energy security and significantly contribute to Australia’s climate mitigation targets, UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Nicola Ison said.

“A growing number of communities, including local councils, are recognising this, however there are significant regulatory and institutional barriers that need to be overcome,” Ms Ison said.

“Across the world renewable energy is changing the way citizens and organisations think about and use energy. In the United States, more than 1,500 wind farms are owned by communities across 27 states and in Germany, customers own two thirds of all renewable energy generated.

“Councils, as large energy users in local communities and facilitators of local action in their own right, can play an increasingly important role in this transition.”

The City of Sydney has recognised the potential of community energy in its roadmap to move the city towards 100 per cent renewable energy by 2030. Sydney’s Lord Mayor Clover Moore said the IPCC’s most recent report has again underlined the extreme urgency of action on . Community-owned renewable energy generation in towns and cities around the country can stimulate regional development, provide more resilient and inexpensive energy security and significantly contribute to Australia’s climate mitigation targets, UTS Institute for Sustainable Futures researcher Nicola Ison said.

“A growing number of communities, including local councils, are recognising this, however there are significant regulatory and institutional barriers that need to be overcome,” Ms Ison said.

“Across the world renewable energy is changing the way citizens and organisations think about and use energy. In the United States, more than 1,500 wind farms are owned by communities across 27 states and in Germany, customers own two thirds of all renewable energy generated.

“Councils, as large energy users in local communities and facilitators of local action in their own right, can play an increasingly important role in this transition.” Continue reading

April 24, 2014 Posted by | energy, New South Wales | Leave a comment

Small scale solar thermal energy initiative unveiled today in New South Wales

sunSolar plant to be unveiled at Wallsend swimming pool http://www.abc.net.au/news/2014-04-15/solar-plant-to-be-unveiled-at-wallsend-swimming-pool/5390322    A revolutionary solar thermal project invented by researchers at the University of Newcastle will be unveiled today at Wallsend swimming pool. The demonstration plant will collect heat from the sun in curved mirrored troughs, producing electricity and heat for on-site use, using the new heat engine technology.

The GRANEX project has been funded by the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA). Researcher Professor Behdad Moghtaderi says the technology will have significant benefits for remote mining and industrial sites in rural communities.

“It can be used in remote communities, aboriginal communities, because all we need is a set of solar arrays,” he said. “You really don’t need diesel fuel, or anything like that.

“The problem is not really the infrastructure as such. “It’s more of a cost and logistical problems associated with transporting diesel fuel.”

The Wallsend swimming centre could save hundreds of dollars on its its annual power bills because of the project.

Professor Moghtaderi says the technology means electricity can be produced with zero carbon emissions from a range of different sources.”Any type of low-grade heat source and also renewable energy sources, in the example that you have for a swimming pool today, essentially we are using solar energy as heat input,” he said. “But, with the same token, you can use geothermal energy, biomass energy or waste heat going out of the stack of power plants and things like that.” ARENA CEO Ivor Frischknecht today joined Parliamentary Secretary for Industry and Paterson MP Bob Baldwin at the official launch.

“The $1.7 million project integrates solar thermal and GRANEX heat engine technology and is supported by $812,000 funding from ARENA,” he said.”The 200 kilowatt solar field, located at the Wallsend swimming complex, will generate 30 kilowatts of electrical output and 150 kilowatts of heat for the swimming pool.

Mr Frischknecht says the demonstration project is the first of its kind and will produce thousands of hours of valuable operating data.”It demonstrates the potential of small-scale solar thermal systems in providing cost effective energy options, particularly for off-grid areas,” he said.

“ARENA recognises the importance of supporting renewable energy projects that are innovative, economically geared and increasingly market-driven – such as those that could deliver low cost power to remote mining communities.

“It is vital that Australia continues to deliver world-leading and cost-effective renewable technology solutions that keep up with economic growth.”

April 16, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

Community solar energy project underway in Illawarra, New South Wales

sunResidents back renewable energy plan http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/story/2208044/residents-back-renewable-energy-plan/?cs=320 April 9, 2014, WOLLONGONG ADVERTISER A group of Illawarra residents aims to set up a small-scale renewable energy project, such as solar panels on a community building roof.
The plan came out of a community energy forum held at the Illawarra Aboriginal Centre, in Wollongong, on March 27.

More than 30 residents turned up to hear a range of speakers talk about community renewable energy projects in Australia and overseas. The event was organised by the Wollongong Climate Action Network to generate interest and share ideas about how the Illawarra could set up its own  project.
Tathra resident and Bega Clean Energy for Eternity member Matthew Nott spoke about the significant efforts his community had made.
Reading about climate change in 2006, Mr Nott said he felt this was one of the greatest challenges we faced. He organised a ‘‘Clean energy for eternity’’ human sign on Tathra Beach, which attracted 3000 people.

With the help of others, Mr Nott ran a fund-raising campaign to place solar panels on community buildings – so far they have provided solar panels to six surf clubs, 12 Rural Fire Service sheds, five churches, 15 community halls and four preschools.
The group’s most ambitious project  is to build Australia’s largest community solar farm, providing half the power needs of Tathra Sewage Treatment Plant.

Graeme Jessop and John Davis from not-for-profit Clear Sky Solutions presented their investment model of renewable energy development. Last year they installed solar panels onto a Boggabri pub using investor funds.

Community Power Agency’s Nicky Ison spoke about community projects overseas. Forum participants agreed to work on a small-scale Illawarra renewable energy project, such as solar panels on a community building.
Organiser Rowan Huxtable said the network was very pleased at the community’s response and urged anyone wanting to help the project to contact them.Information: 0408 372 792 or email thuxtable55@optusnet.com.au

April 10, 2014 Posted by | New South Wales, solar | Leave a comment

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