Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Research results on low-dose radiation confirm the accepted linear theory of radiation cancer

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VAncqK6bl0&feature=share

Low-Dose Radiation ☢ NEW A-Bomb Study

The most important finding regarding the late effects of A-bomb radiation exposure on mortality is an increased risk
of cancer mortality throughout life
Significant radiation-associated increases in risk have been seen for most sites of solid cancer. The dose–response relationship for these sites has tended to show an approximately linear increase with radiation dose. The relative risks for many cancer sites were higher in those exposed as children. 
Studies of the Mortality of Atomic Bomb Survivors, Report 14, 1950–2003: http://www rrjournal.org/doi/pdf/10.1667/RR2629.1 An Overview of Cancer and Noncancer Diseases
Kotaro Ozasa, a,1 Yukiko Shimizu, a Akihiko Suyama, a Fumiyoshi Kasagi, a,b Midori Soda, a Eric J. Grant, a Ritsu Sakata, a Hiromi Sugiyama a and Kazunori Kodama c a Department of Epidemiology and c Chief Scientist, Radiation Effects Research Foundation, 5-2 Hijiyama-koen, Minami-ku, Hiroshima, 732-0815, Japan; and b Institute of Radiation Epidemiology, Radiation Effects Association 1-9-16, Kaji-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 101-0044, Japan
This is the 14th report in a series of periodic general reports on mortality in the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort of
atomic bomb survivors followed by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation to investigate the late health effects of
the radiation from the atomic bombs. During the period 1950–2003, 58% of the 86,611 LSS cohort members with
DS02 dose estimates have died.
The 6 years of additional follow-up since the previous report provide substantially more information at longer periods after radiation exposure (17% more cancer deaths), especially among those under age 10 at exposure (58% more deaths)……
The most important finding regarding the late effects of A-bomb radiation exposure on mortality is an increased risk
of cancer mortality throughout life (2). The rates of excess solid cancer deaths have continued to increase in approximate proportion to radiation dose as the cohort ages.
Significant radiation-associated increases in risk have been seen for most sites of solid cancer. The dose–response relationship for these sites has tended to show an approximately linear increase with radiation dose. The relative risks for many cancer sites were higher in those exposed as children. The relative risks declined with increasing attained age of the subjects as well as the number of years after the bombing, although the excess absolute rates continued to increase with attained age…..

The most important finding regarding the late effects of A-bomb radiation exposure on mortality is an increased risk
of cancer mortality throughout life (2). The current data showed that the risk for all solid cancer deaths has
continued to increase throughout the survivors’ lifetimes in approximate proportion to radiation dose. The sexaveraged relative excess of solid cancer deaths was 42% per Gy at age 70 years after exposure at age 30 based on a linear model with effect modification by age at exposure and
attained age. The sex-averaged excess death rate of all solid
cancer was 26/10,000 person-years per Gy under the same
conditions. The second important finding is that those who were exposed at younger ages had a higher relative risk for
cancer death; e.g., the sex-averaged ERR of solid cancer
deaths was 0.83 at age 70 in those who were exposed at 10
years of age compared with 0.30 in those exposed at age 40……
Effect modification was evaluated for the ERR (Table 4)
and EAR (Table 5) models. The ERR estimates were substantially higher for women than men..
. The highest ERR was observed for cancer of the renal
pelvis and ureter, then cancers of the breast (female only),
other digestive system, bladder, ovary (female only), lung,
colon, esophagus, gall bladder, liver and stomach in
descending order
… In conclusion, the risk of death from malignant neoplasms
in most sites and selected noncancer diseases increased in a
dose-dependent fashion among LSS subjects over the period
1950–2003. The relative risk of radiation for solid cancer
was largest among those exposed at young ages. The results
of this study, which extended the observations for 6 years,
are consistent with previous reports and continue to show
increased cancer risks throughout the survivors’ lifetimes.
Since epidemiological evaluation can be done only after the
development of outcomes, we sincerely pay our respects to
those who have died. It would be our pleasure if
clarification of late health effects of A-bomb radiation
could offer fundamental information for the survivors’
welfare

May 18, 2012 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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