Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Egypt to get nuclear power – is this a GOOD idea?

The site was overrun by residents stripped of ownership of their land for the project after a 10-day sit-in there in January 2011. Part of the plant’s equipment was destroyed to protest the lack of compensation for the land that was expropriated to build the plant.

However, the new political administration in Egypt, which came to power after June 30, struck a deal with the locals that safeguarded the continuity of the project….They were promised that a coastal tourist city would be built for their benefit as a gift from the Egyptian armed forces at a cost of 1 billion Egyptian pounds (about $145.2 million).

Egypt moves ahead with nuclear plant to address electricity crisis ALMONITOR,  AYAH AMAN Egypt Pulse Ayah Aman 29 Nov 13, CAIRO — The Egyptian government is taking new steps to implement its ambitious program to use nuclear energy for the generation of electricity. This comes after the project had been halted due to security, political and economic reasons as well as popular opposition…….

A source at the EAEA told Al-Monitor that the government expected to receive offers from 30 international companies for the execution of the project. The actual competition has been limited to 10 companies from six countries: Russia, China, Japan, South Korea, the United States and France…….

marketig-nukes

“The government will meet the $4 billion financing through grants from companies that it will pay back in installments,” the same source clarified. “However, the Egyptian government has yet to receive any offers for financing or assistance.” He brushed off criticism that external financing constituted a violation of sovereignty, “as it is the only option available to expedite the completion of the project.”

A delegation from the international consulting firm WorleyParsons visited Cairo in early November and met with experts on nuclear safety……… The Supreme Council of Energy is scheduled to hold a meeting next week, chaired by Mansour, to discuss the nuclear dossier and review the steps being considered to hold the tender to build nuclear power plants.

Egypt also intends to search and mine for uranium in the country’s desert regions. The head of the Nuclear Materials Authority, Nagdi Farag, was reported in Egyptian media to have confirmed that Egypt possesses uranium deposits, but their locations could not be divulged to the public. An international auction is expected to be held for drilling and exploration rights, with the assistance of international experts to ensure Egypt’s proper commercial exploitation of its uranium.

A diplomatic source familiar with Egyptian-Russian relations told Al-Monitor, “Egypt may expand its reliance on Russian expertise in building its first nuclear power plant. The subject was discussed during the recent Egyptian-Russian talks that took place in Cairo on Nov. 14.”

The project to build the first Egyptian nuclear plant was met with overwhelming popular objection by the inhabitants of Mersa Matruh, the city where the nuclear plant is to be built. The site was overrun by residents stripped of ownership of their land for the project after a 10-day sit-in there in January 2011. Part of the plant’s equipment was destroyed to protest the lack of compensation for the land that was expropriated to build the plant.

However, the new political administration in Egypt, which came to power after June 30, struck a deal with the locals that safeguarded the continuity of the project.This occurred following a visit by Defense Minister Abdel Fattah al-Sisi to meet with locals and after he sponsored a national reconciliation effort that convinced them to hand over the El-Dabaa plant site to the Nuclear Power Plants Authority. They were promised that a coastal tourist city would be built for their benefit as a gift from the Egyptian armed forces at a cost of 1 billion Egyptian pounds (about $145.2 million).

The head of the coordinating committee between El-Dabaa residents and the government, Mastour Abu Shukara, told Al-Monitor, “The armed forces promised that they would be responsible for the building of the El-Dabaa nuclear power plant project. We welcome this undertaking and consider the Egyptian army to be the responsible guarantor, as far as we are concerned.

“The residents of El-Dabaa withdrew their demands once we made sure that the building of the tourist city had begun to compensate for our land that was taken…..

Egypt’s government still faces many challenges and obstacles that stand in the way of realizing its dream of producing peaceful atomic energy, including the administration’s lack of interest in industries and activities related to nuclear power, as well as the continued concern about external meddling that hampers the new auction. : http://www.al-monitor.com/pulse/originals/2013/11/egypt-nuclear-program-energy-uranium.html##ixzz2m46EzU47

November 28, 2013 - Posted by | Uncategorized

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: