Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Tasmania’s great opportunities in renewable energy

King Island is emblematic of the challenges and opportunities facing the state. It is blessed with natural resources, but punished by its relative remoteness and lack of economies of scale. It has been a perfect testing ground for renewable technology, and has led to the Hydro exporting novel approaches to overseas markets. The project has already avoided the use of 18 million litres of diesel, and saved more than $24 million.

map-tasmania-wind.1Tassie must look to future in renewables, February 29, 2016, ROSALIE WOODRUFF, Mercury “……… The Paris climate agreement sends a clear message to governments and investors that the age of fossil fuels is finished. There is a momentum around renewable energy generation, pushed by an urgency to respond to global warming and an explosion of new technology.

From crisis comes opportunity. The Greens are focused on the long-term task of transitioning Australia away from dependence on fossil fuels. The future is clearly in renewable energy generation, for pragmatism and prosperity.

We have released the Greens Energy Strategy, a blueprint for how the state can get started immediately on setting the business conditions we need to attract medium to large-scale renewable projects.

Our target is for Tasmania to be self-sufficient in clean electricity generation by 2022, and to be net exporters to the mainland. This is achievable.

Other states, such as South Australia and the ACT, have ambitious emission reduction targets and have created pro-renewable market incentives. They have secured billions of dollars of investment.

Through Hydro Tasmania we lead the country in the generation, expertise and experience in renewable energy. The Greens want to make sure we keep this market advantage and attract more jobs and investment.

 The birth of hydropower began 100 years ago, and was the result of heroic forward thinking. There was no other state with this vision in 1916. Now, there are plenty of other states grasping the renewables nettle. We have to act now to make the best of business in the renewable energy century…..

Consider the exciting developments on King Island. Due to its remoteness and small population it has traditionally relied on diesel generators for electricity.

King Island is emblematic of the challenges and opportunities facing the state. It is blessed with natural resources, but punished by its relative remoteness and lack of economies of scale. It has been a perfect testing ground for renewable technology, and has led to the Hydro exporting novel approaches to overseas markets. The project has already avoided the use of 18 million litres of diesel, and saved more than $24 million.

We propose establishing an independent statutory authority, RenewTAS, to use market tools to trigger a bidding war between renewable energy firms to compete for the chance to build generators in Tasmania. It will work with electricity generators, including Hydro Tasmania, and regulators to attract investment, and to drive down the cost of power.

While the Liberals wait for the market to solve our problems, the Greens know government can lead and create conditions for a market and required investment.

Some of the largest firms in the world, like Tesla and Google, have a preference for setting up in regions with high levels of renewable energy, and the trend is increasing in other industries. We have a brand advantage in marketing Tasmania as a low-carbon economy.

Rosalie Woodruff is Greens MHA for Franklin. http://www.themercury.com.au/news/opinion/talking-point-tassie-must-look-to-future-in-renewables/news-story/efe53155ca4c4f943569eed361135503

March 2, 2016 - Posted by | energy, Tasmania

1 Comment »

  1. Hello !

    Thanks for your article, it is really great 🙂
    I have visited the Tasmania and it was amazing ! I wrote an article about this magical place on my website:
    https://operalphotography.wordpress.com/2016/12/07/tasmania/

    Marianne

    Comment by operalphotography | January 12, 2017 | Reply


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