Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Maralinga: art exhibition raises the question- what has changed in pro nuclear activities?

see-this.wayArt exhibition to mark 60th anniversary of nuclear testing in Maralinga asks what has changed ABC Central Victoria  By Larissa Romensky , 22 Sept 16,  A national touring exhibition of artwork marks 60 years after the British government exploded an atomic bomb in South Australia’s outback.

On September 27, 1956 the British government conducted its first atomic test at Maralinga.

In total, seven nuclear bomb blasts were detonated between 1956 and 1967 in the southern part of the Great Victoria Desert in South Australia followed by more than 600 “minor tests”.

These were not the first nuclear tests to be conducted in Australia, but the term Maralinga, an Aboriginal word for thunder, became the name associated with this chapter in Australian history.

Black Mist Burnt Country, is a national touring exhibition that revisits the events and its location through the work of more than 30 Indigenous and non-Indigenous artists.

Curator JD Mittman said the title refers to the “mysterious” black mist that hovered over the country after the first test at Emu Field in South Australia in 1953 that “badly” affected Aboriginal families at Wallatinna.

“[Yankunytjatjara man] Yami Lester testified that people got very sick, some died, and he lost his eyesight,” Mr Mittman said.

Burnt country was in reference to the enormous heat generated by an atomic bomb blast, 1,000 times hotter than the sun.

“The blast melts the ground to glass, also called Trinitide, after the Trinity test ," he said.

Inspired by Jonathan Kumintjarra Brown

Jonathan Kumintjara Brown was a member of the stolen generation and later in life connected with his family in South Australia and found out about the atomic testing of his traditional land.

Mr Mittman said the exhibition was originally inspired by the artist's work entitled Marilinga before the atomic test.

"The question that came to mind immediately was: if there's a work that depicts the country before the atomic tests then surely there must be work that is also about the period after or during the tests," he said.

The work in the exhibition spans seven decades from across the globe from the first atomic test in Hiroshima to the present day, from both private and public collections........http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-21/exhibition-to-mark-60th-anniversary-of-nuclear-testing/7865192

September 23, 2016 - Posted by | aboriginal issues, AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, culture

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