Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

INCIDENTS RELATED TO TRANSPORT OF RADIATION INSTRUMENTS IN AUSTRALIA

Kim Mavromatis No Nuclear Waste Dump Anywhere in South Australia, October 2 

INCIDENTS RELATED TO TRANSPORT OF RADIATION INSTRUMENTS IN AUST (ARPANSA Aust Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Authority website identifies transport accidents) : “The most common incidents include vehicles carrying the source (radioactive material) being involved in a road accident or the source falling from the vehicle carrying the source. On other occasions containers may be damaged in transit and subsequently sources (radioactive material) may be dislodged from internal packing and shielding. CAUSES : Human Error, speed, alcohol, fatigue, loose fittings, maintenance, inadequate systems, training, oversight”.

Transport accidents of nuclear waste have occured in Aust, because of human error :

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH / THE ADVERTISER (2012) : TOXIC HIGHWAY : “Why radioactive materials, a banned pesticide and food were on the same truck that crashed on the New South Wales Pacific Highway in 1980 is a mystery. But the political fallout of its roadside burial and discovery 32 years later – which left five contractors vomiting and exposed another 13 workers to possibly lethal toxic waste – will be nothing short of nuclear”.https://www.facebook.com/groups/1314655315214929/

October 4, 2019 Posted by | - incidents, AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL | Leave a comment

Climate change the essential factor in planning about droughts

Drought plan must factor in climate change,     https://www.smh.com.au/business/small-business/drought-plan-must-factor-in-climate-change-20191003-p52xfn.html   Lisa Davies, 4 Oct 19,    As country towns across the inland run out of drinking water, the federal government has started to show its concern for farmers affected by the drought.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison went to Dalby in Queensland last week to announce a $100 million drought package and Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has taken time off his day job for a three-day tour of NSW and Queensland.

On one hand, country people will be comforted that the government is paying attention to their plight. On the other, they will ask whether another parade of politicians putting on moleskins and fronting a press pack in the dust will make any difference.

As country towns across the inland run out of drinking water, the federal government has started to show its concern for farmers affected by the drought.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison went to Dalby in Queensland last week to announce a $100 million drought package and Treasurer Josh Frydenberg has taken time off his day job for a three-day tour of NSW and Queensland.

On one hand, country people will be comforted that the government is paying attention to their plight. On the other, they will ask whether another parade of politicians putting on moleskins and fronting a press pack in the dust will make any difference.

Everyone says the government needs to do something but for now the government’s basic approach is to dribble out more money and hope that it rains.

That is probably all that can be done in a crisis.

But it is not the whole answer. It ignores the crucial issue of what to do if the scientists are right and droughts are becoming longer and more frequent.

This question should not be conflated with the equally important issue of whether Australia should have a stronger climate change policy.

Deeper cuts in Australia’s carbon emissions are needed to help slow the rise in global temperatures but it will not solve the farmers’ problems overnight. Scientists say droughts will get worse for decades.

The Herald  backs drought assistance to help farmers cope but it should be fair and efficient and it should be designed to encourage farmers to adjust to the new climate conditions.

In fact, the Productivity Commission says a lot of money is already being spent. Sheep, cattle and grain farmers in 2017-18 received about $1.3 billion in state and federal government subsidies. Those farmers now receive 5.8 per cent of their income as subsidies from the government, compared with just 3.7 per cent five years ago, a higher rate of subsidy than any industry sector.

Farmers also receive lots of other indirect help such as state subsidies on freight for fodder as well as generous household payments worth up to $37,000 per couple, far more than age pensioners or single parents.

Yet many people who receive drought relief are not poor. The latest drought package has allowed people with assets up to $5 million to apply.

Mr Morrison says this is not welfare but it is still taxpayers’ money and it should be spent prudently.

Sometimes it seems it is not. The government was left red-faced this week when it emerged that Moyne Shire in western Victoria that got $1 million under Mr Morrison’s announcement was not actually affected by the drought. Equally, it appears that former “drought envoy” Barnaby Joyce was was not required to produce a report to justify his salary and expenses.

Many economists are concerned more deeply that the cash will distort farmers’ decisions about how to react to the changing climate. For instance, some drought assistance compensates farmers who decided not to manage their risk by selling stock at a better price early in the drought.

Farmers groups sometimes call for more dams as a panacea. But it is often hard to produce a long-term business case for them. Fans of dams also often ignore the risk that they will reduce water flows to surrounding farms and the environment.

Unfortunately, even with the best government plan, climate change will reshape Australia’s rural society.

Some farmers will adjust their methods and succeed. Some will decide to sell up their farms to big businesses and do something else. Governments should help those in need but rural Australia must accept that the times are changing

 

October 4, 2019 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, climate change - global warming | Leave a comment

Bill Gates is wrong. Nuclear power will not save the climate.

according to the International Energy Agency (IEA), the largest share of this [needed greenhouse gas] reduction – almost 40 percent – could come from improved energy efficiency….One third of that could be covered by renewable energies, while in this scenario, nuclear power would account for five percent.

..Indeed, in order to actually deliver on such a contribution, hundreds of new reactors would have to be built. “It would involve a gigantic nuclear dimension just to make a minimal contribution to the climate,”

One of the questions that has received very little attention so far is how reliable nuclear power plants will be in a warmer world……This year, reactors were again disconnected from the grid in Europe as a result of heat waves.

October 4, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Black swans – the bushfires of the future are already here.

Australia is not prepared to fight the bushfires of the future, experts warn, Background Briefing  Oct 5 19, An investigation by Background Briefing, ABC Regional and Landline   The bushfires of the future are already here. They burn earlier in the season, and more ferociously, and can interact with extreme weather events to create fires we don’t know how to fight.

Key points

  • The national aerial firefighting centre, which two years ago flagged the need for an $11m funding boost, still has not received a decision from the Federal Government
  • The Government has not guaranteed funding for the only national body researching the future of bushfires
  • Twenty-three emergency services experts calling on the Government to consider the threat of climate change in fire planning have not received a response

This year, the bushfire season began with the worst September in recorded history, with 55 homes destroyed.

The Australian winter was only just in the rear-view mirror when 130 bushfires ripped through southern Queensland and northern NSW in one day.

Australia’s former chief scientist, Ian Chubb, said it was clear the climate was changing.

“It’s not just some passing phase that it didn’t rain this decade,” he said. “The implications of that for fire are pretty obvious.”

Former New South Wales fire and rescue commissioner and Climate Council member Greg Mullins said unprecedented conditions could give rise to so-called Black Swan fire events.

“We’re going to have fires that I can’t comprehend, and I’ve been in the game for nearly half a century,” he said.

A Black Swan is something without precedent and thought to be impossible, until it happens.

When it comes to bushfires, these Black Swans happen as our environment changes, creating conditions firefighters have never seen before.

Emergency experts and senior scientists have told a joint ABC investigation that a comprehensive national plan is needed to tackle the fires of the future, and they are concerned about the lack of financial commitment from the Federal Government for resources and research.

“This is a national issue that all people in Australia, regardless of whether they are left or right, have a right to expect that we will face up to challenges that are ahead,” Professor Chubb said.

Inside a Black Swan fire event

When an unprecedented heatwave swept New South Wales in 2017, it set the conditions for a Black Swan fire event.

The Sir Ivan fire began east of Dunedoo and would burn through 55,000 hectares……….

Australia: NSW fires out of control and the temperatures nears 50C

The blaze was unlike anything the NSW RFS had ever dealt with, according to Commissioner Shane Fitzsimmons.

“It was unprecedented in New South Wales,” he said……..https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-04/the-bushfires-of-the-future-are-here-black-swan/11559930

October 4, 2019 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, climate change - global warming | Leave a comment

No need for nuclear reactor, with now a new process to supply molybdenum-99 (Mo-99)

Nuclear fusion process could create US supply of Mo-99 https://www.dotmed.com/news/story/48759, by Lisa Chamoff, Contributing Reporter | October 04, 2019  A new nuclear fusion process may shore up supply of the rapidly-decaying, cancer-detecting radioisotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) without the need for reactor facilities.

Nuclear technology company Phoenix and SHINE Medical Technologies, a medical isotope production company, this week announced that in July it surpassed a record for a nuclear fusion reaction in a steady-state system.

The reaction at SHINE’s medical isotope production facility produced 46 trillion neutrons per second, surpassing the previous record set at a California facility by nearly 25 percent.

The technology will drive SHINE’s production of Mo-99, which decays into the diagnostic imaging agent technetium 99m (Tc-99m), and other radioisotopes, with production scheduled to start in 2021 at a facility in Wisconsin.

Currently, only a handful of government-owned nuclear research reactors produce Mo-99, which has a 66-hour half-life, and none of them are in the U.S., which uses half the global supply.

The companies say the eight Phoenix systems will help address limited accessibility to nuclear reactors for producing medical isotopes, used for cardiac stress testing and cancer detection, and meet a third of the global demand.

The companies expect to produce 20 million doses per year once the plant is up and running. SHINE has already sent Mo-99 samples produced by this method to GE Healthcare to be tested and verified.

Mo-99 is created by accelerating a particle beam into a target and generating a nuclear fusion reaction. The company developed a proprietary nuclear fusion process that uses a gaseous target instead of solid one, said Evan Sengbusch, president of Phoenix.

“The ion beam isn’t wasting energy with a solid matrix,” Sengbusch told HCB News. “It is cheaper than a nuclear reactor and doesn’t produce nuclear waste.”

October 4, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Nuclear company EDF denounced by France’s economy minister as a “state within a state” —

Originally posted on nuclear-news: Times, 30 Sept 19 President Macron’s economy minister has accused the French state-owned company building Britain’s new nuclear plant of “unacceptable” failings as he threatened sweeping change at the group. Bruno Le Maire said yesterday that the French nuclear sector was like “a state within a state” and he denounced cost…

via Nuclear company EDF denounced by France’s economy minister as a “state within a state” —

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

October 4 Energy News — geoharvey

Science and Technology: ¶ “Students, Teachers: Drift Along With An Epic Arctic Climate Expedition” • K-12 students around the world can now be a part of one of the largest Arctic climate research expeditions ever conducted. In September, the RV Polarstern icebreaker set out to freeze itself in Arctic sea ice. For the next year […]

via October 4 Energy News — geoharvey

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Experts want air-con “clunkers” replaced to soften Victoria demand peaks, cut bills — RenewEconomy

Industry body calls for more support to replace air conditioner “clunkers” as Victoria hails successes of energy efficiency scheme The post Experts want air-con “clunkers” replaced to soften Victoria demand peaks, cut bills appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via Experts want air-con “clunkers” replaced to soften Victoria demand peaks, cut bills — RenewEconomy

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

XXXX! Hundreds of pubs slash energy costs through Lion deal on solar — RenewEconomy

Lion breweries signs major group PPA deal with Simply Energy to supply more than 300 pubs and hotels with cheaper solar power. The post XXXX! Hundreds of pubs slash energy costs through Lion deal on solar appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via XXXX! Hundreds of pubs slash energy costs through Lion deal on solar — RenewEconomy

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Solar Insiders Podcast: Big little lies on emissions, and the Model 3 — RenewEconomy

Government caught out lying on emissions, solar installs at record high, and first impressions of Model 3 and Fonzarelli’s new electric motorbike. The post Solar Insiders Podcast: Big little lies on emissions, and the Model 3 appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via Solar Insiders Podcast: Big little lies on emissions, and the Model 3 — RenewEconomy

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New scientific study describes severe consequences of a limited, regional nuclear war — IPPNW peace and health blog

New research on the consequences of a limited, regional nuclear war, published this week in the peer-reviewed journal Science Advances, concludes that the casualty levels and long-term impacts on the global environment will be far more severe than previously believed.

via New scientific study describes severe consequences of a limited, regional nuclear war — IPPNW peace and health blog

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Renewables deliver 47% of total generation in Germany so far in 2019 — RenewEconomy

Germany has sourced 47% of its electricity generation from renewables so far in 2019, and for the last 7 months renewables have outstripped fossil fuels. The post Renewables deliver 47% of total generation in Germany so far in 2019 appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via Renewables deliver 47% of total generation in Germany so far in 2019 — RenewEconomy

October 4, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment