Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Don’t nuke the climate Australia

DON’T NUKE THE CLIMATE

One of the biggest threats facing our planet is climate change, it warrants urgent action, nuclear power is not the solution. Rather than fuel carbon emissions and radioactive risk through domestic coal power plants and the export of coal and uranium, Australia should embrace the fastest growing global energy sector ‒ renewables ‒ and become a driver of clean energy thinking and technology. Renewable energy is affordable, low risk, clean, and popular. Nuclear is simply not. Our shared energy future is renewable, not radioactive.

We are a group of civil society environment groups who have come together to respond to the latest push for nuclear power in Australia. We are not aligned to any political groups or ideology but unite over our position against nuclear power which is proving to be an expensive distraction to the very real need to respond to the climate emergency we face.

In January 2019, the Climate Council, comprising Australia’s leading climate scientists and other policy experts, issued a policy statement concluding that nuclear power plants “are not appropriate for Australia – and probably never will be”. The statement continued: “Nuclear power stations are highly controversial, can’t be built under existing law in any Australian state or territory, are a more expensive source of power than renewable energy, and present significant challenges in terms of the storage and transport of nuclear waste, and use of water”……….https://dontnuketheclimate.wordpress.com/

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October 10, 2019 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, Opposition to nuclear | Leave a comment

Navy chief looks to nuclear submarines for Australia

Submarines may be switched to nuclear, says navy vice admiral, Australia’s navy chief says it’s possible the country’s future submarine fleet could eventually switch to nuclear power.
Vice Admiral Mike Noonan has opened an international maritime conference in Sydney, where he says defence is keeping a close eye on emerging technologies.
  By Andrew Greene on AM  9 Oct 19, Australia’s navy chief says it’s possible the country’s future submarine fleet could eventually switch to nuclear power.
Vice Admiral Mike Noonan has opened an international maritime conference in Sydney, where he says defence is keeping a close eye on emerging technologies.

https://www.abc.net.au/radio/programs/am/submarines-may-be-switched-to-nuclear,-says-navy-vice-admiral/11584988

October 10, 2019 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, weapons and war | Leave a comment

Bushfires continue burning across Australia, destroying homes 

Bushfires continue burning across Australia, destroying homes    https://www.sbs.com.au/news/bushfires-continue-burning-across-australia-destroying-homes    Police capture footage of residents being forced to evacuate their homes as bushfires sweep across NSW and Queensland.

October 10, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

More bribery to Kimba and Hawker communities as nuclear waste dump ballot nears

Robyn Wood, 9 Oct 19, More bribes for both Kimba and Flinders communities to sway the vote. This government is so blatant. To say the community needs mental health support for those distressed by the dump is a massive insult. My excerpts with underlining of the unbelievable bits:

A range of projects and initiatives can meet the criteria for funding through the program, including local infrastructure upgrades, services, apprenticeships and mental health initiativesThe funding is not dependant on the results of the upcoming ballots which will take place in the District Council of Kimba and the Flinders Ranges Council. An additional $31 million will also be available through a Community Development Package for the community chosen to host the proposed facility.

Federal government announces $4 million funding program for communities in radioactive waste debate, Transcontinental

A new benefit program has been announced for communities at the crux of the radioactive waste facility debate.

The federal government has revealed a $4 million funding program for each of the two communities considering the facility, around Kimba and Wallerberdina Station.

Minister for Resources and Northern Australia Matt Canavan said the new funding is a response to community feedback and reflected the delays in the site selection process.

Consultation on the proposed facility commenced in 2016.

“We recognise that the communities have engaged in debate in good faith and we remain committed to supporting them through the site selection process. This investment will support the communities as well as deliver projects and initiatives that can further diversify the local economies,” he said.

“The Flinders Ranges and Kimba are great country places that I have had the pleasure to get to know better through this process.

“We have been listening to the community and we are responding, particularly with respect to investing in services that support the wellbeing of people in these local communities.”

A range of projects and initiatives can meet the criteria for funding through the program, including local infrastructure upgrades, services, apprenticeships and mental health initiatives.

The funding is not dependant on the results of the upcoming ballots which will take place in the District Council of Kimba and the Flinders Ranges Council.

An additional $31 million will also be available through a Community Development Package for the community chosen to host the proposed facility.

Radioactive waste is currently spread over more than 100 locations around Australia and the federal government wants to see it consolidated into a single purpose built facility in line with international best practice.

But Australian Conservation Foundation’s Dave Sweeney said there is no urgency to move the material and more conversations are needed.

“There is no radioactive waste management crisis in Australia,” he said.

“95 per cent of the material that will head to any site in South Australia is currently in secure storage under federal control today, and it will be tomorrow, and it will be for a year and can be for 35 more years.

“The federal regulator, the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, has said repeatedly that there’s no urgency to move the most severe and the most problematic material which is the intermediate level waste which is currently based at Lucas heights in Sydney.”

Voting commences in the District Council of Kimba this week, while the Flinders Ranges Council have confirmed that it will hold a community ballot between November 11 and December 12.

October 10, 2019 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, Federal nuclear waste dump | Leave a comment

Danger of drones attacking nuclear facilities

Korea Times 6th Oct 2019, National infrastructure sites are vulnerable to possible drone strikes, with a growing number of intrusions at nuclear power plants here using the small unmanned aircraft being confirmed, according to a lawmaker, Sunday.
Rep. Lee Sang-min of the ruling Democratic Party of Korea (DPK) said the
Nuclear Safety and Security Commission (NSSC) reported 13 cases of the
illegal flying of drones near the power plants from 2015 to 19. Ten of the
13 cases occurred just in 2019 ― and six took place near the Kori Nuclear
Power Plant in northern Busan in August.
https://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/tech/2019/10/133_276717.html

October 10, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Japan’s corrupt “Nuclear Village” is still thriving

Hidden gold, ‘murky’ payoffs threaten Japan nuclear revival,  Straits Times,  TOKYO (BLOOMBERG) 9 Oct 19, – A payoff scandal has struck Japan’s nuclear world, threatening to delay the restart of idled reactors in what’s becoming the industry’s biggest crisis since the Fukushima meltdown of 2011.The issue, which emerged at the end of last month, centres around how an influential municipal official in a town that hosts a nuclear plant spent years doling out large gifts to executives of its operator, one of the country’s biggest power producers.

It’s an example of how big business and small towns work together, sometimes at the expense of corporate governance.

The payments to senior management at Kansai Electric Power Co included hundreds of millions of yen, US currency, vouchers for tailored suits and even gold coins hidden in a box of candy.

To make matters worse, the official in question was close to – and received money from – a company that won construction work from the utility.

The news is a blow to an already deeply unpopular industry as it seeks to resume operations at plants that were shuttered after Fukushima. It’s likely to have an impact beyond Kansai Electric, with the government’s top spokesman, who called the payoffs “murky,” vowing to investigate whether there are similar cases at other companies.

It’s also a headache for Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, who has set his stall as a proponent of nuclear power, a cheaper source of energy than imported fuels such as oil, coal and natural gas. And questions in Parliament about the scandal may delay Mr Abe’s efforts to pass a US trade deal and proceed towards changing the country’s pacifist Constitution.

…….The scandal is the latest exposure of governance issues at Japanese companies, which include the arrest last year of Nissan Motor Co’s chairman for concealing more than US$140 million (S$193 million) in compensation and Kobe Steel’s indictment in 2018 for falsifying quality data.

Kansai Electric chairman Makoto Yagi and president Shigeki Iwane bowed in apology at a three-hour public briefing last week as they detailed how they and 18 other executives received almost 320 million yen (S$4.12 million) in cash and presents from 2006 to 2018 from Mr Eiji Moriyama, the former deputy mayor of Takahama town, where a nuclear power plant is located. Mr Moriyama died at the age of 90 in March……..

The immediate risk for Kansai Electric is that the issue may delay the restart of three of its reactors, including two in the town in question, Takahama. Every month a reactor stays offline saddles the utility with extra fuel costs of 3.6 billion yen ……….

Kansai Electric’s investigation will leave no stone unturned to determine the cause and events surrounding the payments, the company said in an e-mailed response. The utility will also make efforts to ensure that this type of incident doesn’t happen again, it said.

In a sense, the goings-on at Kansai Electric suggest things haven’t changed in the nuclear industry. They mirror what independent investigators said in a 2012 report led to the scale of the Fukushima meltdown: collusion between government officials and a power company.

“This is the nuclear village at its worst,” Temple University’s Mr Kingston said, referring to the nexus of companies, politicians, bureaucrats and others that promote atomic power. “The cosy and collusive ties are a hotbed of corruption and raise questions about other plants.” https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/hidden-gold-murky-payoffs-threaten-japan-nuclear-revival

October 10, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

France’s “flagship”nuclear project Falamanville – more costs, more delay

EDF adds further €1.5bn to Flamanville nuclear plant costs https://www.ft.com/content/fc6a8610-ea5e-11e9-a240-3b065ef5fc55  French energy group also confirms latest delay to opening of long-awaited project.

David Keohane in Paris 9 Oct 19, French energy giant EDF announced increased costs to its long-troubled flagship nuclear project at Flamanville on Wednesday as it confirmed delays to the opening of the plant due to faulty weldings. The company said construction costs would rise by €1.5bn to €12.4bn and the loading of nuclear fuel would be delayed until the end of 2022, which had previously been scheduled for the end of 2019 with commercial activity starting in 2020. The group, which is 83.7 per cent owned by the French government, had flagged the delays at the plant in north-western France to the end of 2022 during its half-year results in July. Flamanville was originally expected to cost €3.3bn and start operations in 2012. Continue reading

October 10, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Time that USA Congress faced up to the problem of nuclear wastes

nuclear and climate change. While many argue that we have to do everything in our power to bolster nuclear energy in order to effectively fight the climate crisis, bluntly, nuclear energy is not a realistic solution

The price tag for new nuclear is too high and the timeline for expansion too long—Plant Vogtle and VC Summer show us that. And while nuclear reactors may not directly emit greenhouse gases, that doesn’t mean that it’s a clean energy source. There are significant traditional environmental impacts from nuclear energy, primarily regarding radiation risks and impacts to water quality. Then there’s the effects climate change will have on the functioning and safety of nuclear plants themselves. The more we look at the issue, the more we see that sea level rise and heat waves risk the safety and dependability of nuclear plants. 

It’s Time to Bury These Nuclear Waste Talking Points https://www.nrdc.org/experts/caroline-reiser/its-time-bury-these-nuclear-waste-talking-points

October 09, 2019 Caroline Reiser

This year we’re seeing yet another attempt from Congress to address the fifty-year problem of what to do with the 80,000 tons of nuclear waste sitting across the country, with approximately 2,000 more tons produced every year by the 96 operating U.S. nuclear reactors. Unfortunately, the multiple nuclear waste bills that sprung up in both the House and Senate (including H.R.2699 which just cleared an Energy and Commerce subcommittee) simply offer the same worn out ideas. Continue reading

October 10, 2019 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

AEMO’s Zibelman calls for system plan, says ‘just in time’ investment won’t work — RenewEconomy

AEMO head reiterates calls for a solid and stable plan for energy market investment to avoid further supply shortages. The post AEMO’s Zibelman calls for system plan, says ‘just in time’ investment won’t work appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via AEMO’s Zibelman calls for system plan, says ‘just in time’ investment won’t work — RenewEconomy

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Has Australia ‘over-invested’ in renewable energy? — RenewEconomy

Spoiler alert: No. And energy minister Angus Taylor clearly hasn’t been paying attention to the history of our electricity infrastructure. The post Has Australia ‘over-invested’ in renewable energy? appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via Has Australia ‘over-invested’ in renewable energy? — RenewEconomy

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Is Angus Taylor on a one-man mission to stop wind and solar? — RenewEconomy

Energy minister Angus Taylor appears to be on a one man mission to fulfil the destiny wished of him by his supporters – to stop wind and solar in their tracks. The post Is Angus Taylor on a one-man mission to stop wind and solar? appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via Is Angus Taylor on a one-man mission to stop wind and solar? — RenewEconomy

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

EnergyAustralia calls for “unity” to enable “inevitable” transition to renewables — RenewEconomy

EnergyAustralia’s Catherine Tanna says that decarbonisation of the energy sector is inevitable and calls for ‘tribalism’ to stop. The post EnergyAustralia calls for “unity” to enable “inevitable” transition to renewables appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via EnergyAustralia calls for “unity” to enable “inevitable” transition to renewables — RenewEconomy

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

BHP turns to renewables to power huge copper mine in Chile — RenewEconomy

BHP says finalising deal that will switch power supply at world’s biggest copper mine in Chile from gas to renewables. The post BHP turns to renewables to power huge copper mine in Chile appeared first on RenewEconomy.

via BHP turns to renewables to power huge copper mine in Chile — RenewEconomy

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sharing a story of survival — IPPNW peace and health blog

I speak as a member of the family of hibakusha – those of us who, by some miraculous chance, survived the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For more than seven decades, we have worked for the total abolition of nuclear weapons. On the seventh of July of 2017, I was overwhelmed with joy when a great majority of the world’s nations voted to adopt the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Having witnessed humanity at its worst, I witnessed, that day, humanity at its best. We hibakusha had been waiting for the ban for seventy-two years. Let it be the beginning of the end of nuclear weapons.

via Sharing a story of survival — IPPNW peace and health blog

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sharing a story of survival — IPPNW peace and health blog

I speak as a member of the family of hibakusha – those of us who, by some miraculous chance, survived the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. For more than seven decades, we have worked for the total abolition of nuclear weapons. On the seventh of July of 2017, I was overwhelmed with joy when a great majority of the world’s nations voted to adopt the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Having witnessed humanity at its worst, I witnessed, that day, humanity at its best. We hibakusha had been waiting for the ban for seventy-two years. Let it be the beginning of the end of nuclear weapons.

via Sharing a story of survival — IPPNW peace and health blog

October 10, 2019 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment