Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

David Suzuki on nuclear power as a climate change solution ”I want to puke.”

I want to puke. Because politicians love to say, “Oh, yeah, we care about this and boy, there’s [nuclear] technology just around the corner.”

Yeah, it’s taken a child [environmental activist Greta Thunberg] to finally have an impact that is more than all of us environmentalists put together over the past years. 

The power of that child is that she’s got no vested interest in anything. She’s just saying: “Listen to the science because the scientists are telling us I have no future if we don’t take some drastic action.”

I want to puke’: David Suzuki reacts to O’Regan’s nuclear power endorsement

The Nature of Things host also addressed the climate crisis and youth’s role in climate change   https://www.cbc.ca/radio/checkup/is-it-time-to-call-an-election-1.5728483/i-want-to-puke-david-suzuki-reacts-to-o-regan-s-nuclear-power-endorsement-1.5731819

CBC Radio Sep 21, 2020   David Suzuki spoke to Checkup host Ian Hanomansing about how to tackle climate change while in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, and took questions from callers, in Sunday’s Ask Me Anything segment.

With the COVID-19 pandemic at the forefront of the news cycle, it might be easy to forget about the ongoing climate change crisis.

While managing the pandemic has become the first priority of the Canadian government and other governments around the world, climate change was a major talking point in the 2019 federal election campaign.

This summer, the last intact ice shelf in the Canadian Arctic collapsed. South of the border, dry, hot weather conditions in states such as Oregon and Washington have led to historic wildfires.

David Suzuki is a scientist and environmental activist. He’s also the host of The Nature of Things on CBC television. Continue reading

September 22, 2020 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Small Nuclear Reactors look good – on paper!

Lockdown alternatives look good on paper: So do nuclear reactors, Independent Australia, By John Quiggin | 22 September 2020,  Amid mounting pressure for a “hands-off” approach to pandemic controls, Professor John Quiggin explains the real costs of the “let her rip” strategy.

BACK IN 1953, the founder of the U.S. naval nuclear program, Admiral Hyman Rickover, drew a striking contrast between “paper reactors” and “real reactors”:

An academic [paper] reactor or reactor plant almost always has the following basic characteristics: (1) It is simple. (2) It is small. (3) It is cheap. (4) It is light. (5) It can be built very quickly. (6) It is very flexible in purpose (“omnibus reactor”). (7) Very little development is required. It will use mostly “off-the-shelf” components. (8) The reactor is in the study phases. It is not being built now.

On the other hand, a practical [real] reactor plant can be distinguished by the following characteristics: (1) It is being built now. (2) It is behind schedule. (3) It is requiring an immense amount of development on apparently trivial items. Corrosion, in particular, is a problem. (4) It is very expensive. (5) It takes a long time to build because of the engineering development problems. (6) It is large. (7) It is heavy. (8) It is complicated.

The tools of the academic-reactor designer are a piece of paper and a pencil with an eraser. If a mistake is made, it can always be erased and changed. If the practical-reactor designer errs, he wears the mistake around his neck; it cannot be erased. Everyone can see it.

Rickover’s insight has been borne out many times, as a long series of new reactor designs, promising power “too cheap to meter”, have come in over time and over budget. The latest such paper reactor, the Small Modular Reactor being developed by NuScale Power recently received design approval from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Quietly tucked away in the announcement was the prediction that the first 12-module plant being developed for Utah Associated Municipal Power Systems would be operational by 2030. Until last week, the announced target was 2027. And when the project was first funded, commercial operation was projected for 2023

The contrast drawn by Rickover applies equally well to the policies proposed by critics of the elimination and suppression policies adopted around the world in response to the COVID-19 pandemic………..

Unlike Rickover’s paper reactors, these theoretical policies are typically not spelt out in much detail. Rather, the adverse effects of real policies, such as the hardship associated with travel restrictions and the economic cost of lockdowns are pointed out, and it is claimed that it would have been far better to accept a few deaths, mostly of old people who were going to die soon anyway.  ….

Broadly speaking, the earlier and more comprehensive the control policy, the better the outcomes in terms of both (market) economic activity and health outcomes. (With a proper understanding of economics, health outcomes are economic outcomes, whether or not they affect market activity). ……..

…. https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/lockdown-alternatives-look-good-on-paper-so-do-nuclear-reactors,14333

September 22, 2020 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Nuke Ban: Former Statesmen, et al Promoting — limitless life

Open Letter in Support of the 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons Under embargo until 21 September 2020, 00:00 UTC This open letter in support of the 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons has been signed by 56 former presidents, prime ministers, foreign ministers and defence ministers from 20 NATO member […]

Nuke Ban: Former Statesmen, et al Promoting — limitless life

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Anything but wind or solar: Taylor’s technology plan is “roadmap to nowhere” — RenewEconomy

The Coalition’s latest energy policy labelled a ‘roadmap to nowhere’, after sidelining wind and solar and failing to set a post-2030 emissions target. The post Anything but wind or solar: Taylor’s technology plan is “roadmap to nowhere” appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Anything but wind or solar: Taylor’s technology plan is “roadmap to nowhere” — RenewEconomy

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Money talks, BS walks: It’s global comedy hour, with a special Australian segment — RenewEconomy

The federal government energy and climate policy has turned into complete farce. The post Money talks, BS walks: It’s global comedy hour, with a special Australian segment appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Money talks, BS walks: It’s global comedy hour, with a special Australian segment — RenewEconomy

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Technology roadmap delays climate action by denying rapid deployment — RenewEconomy

To hit climate goals we need to accelerate deployment of mature technologies beyond the ‘natural’ rate of build. The technology roadmap doesn’t do that. The post Technology roadmap delays climate action by denying rapid deployment appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Technology roadmap delays climate action by denying rapid deployment — RenewEconomy

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Australians suffer $2 billion health bill from summer bushfire smoke, researchers say — RenewEconomy

Researchers estimate smoke related health costs from summer bushfires at almost $2 billion, warning climate change will make the future worse. The post Australians suffer $2 billion health bill from summer bushfire smoke, researchers say appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Australians suffer $2 billion health bill from summer bushfire smoke, researchers say — RenewEconomy

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

September 21 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion: ¶ “Climate Intelligence Is Business Intelligence” • Politicization of climate change is clouding public perspective on the subject. Nevertheless, some leaders in the “real economy” are aligning with policymakers and civil society on the urgency of quickly slowing humanity’s contribution to accelerating climate change. We have a tool to support that. [CleanTechnica] ¶ “Trump […]

September 21 Energy News — geoharvey

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Richest 10% Emit Double The Carbon Of The World’s Poorest — Stanisland

A new report by Oxfam has revealed the world’s richest account for 52% of global emissions

Richest 10% Emit Double The Carbon Of The World’s Poorest — Stanisland

September 22, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment