Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Relief in Kimba, that Labor and crossbench Senators want a fair process on nuclear wastes

No Radioactive Waste Facility for Kimba District– 14 Nov 20  · We are reassured by this week’s events that there are still many in Australian politics who believe in a fair process. The lack of support from Labor and crossbench Senators for the Government’s proposed Bill to legislate Kimba as the chosen site for the national radioactive waste dump is certainly a relief to us.
It is obvious that this was an attempt to sneak through a law that would remove accountability by the Government for their unfair and manipulative process, which they clearly do not believe would hold up to scrutiny. Whilst it’s likely our fight is far from over, what this means for us is that, if the Minister uses his power under the current Act to declare the site in Kimba, our rights to judicial review remain intact.
We are grateful, as always, for the strong show of support we have received over the last few weeks.
We have spent two very productive days at Parliament House speaking about our concerns regarding the proposed Kimba dump site and the Government’s attempts to pass legislation that intentionally takes away our rights to judicial review. Thank you to all of our supporters who helped get us there, this has been a long and expensive fight, but our voices are being heard. https://www.facebook.com/noradwastekimba/

November 13, 2020 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, Federal nuclear waste dump, politics | Leave a comment

Biden and Harris include fantasy of ”small nuclear reactors” in an otherwise progressive climate policy

the Biden-Harris agenda lists small modular reactors under its “game-changing technologies.” In a way, that’s correct. Diverting money into small modular reactors will be game-changing. It will put us firmly on the road to climate failure.

The good news is that nuclear power does not play much of a role in the Biden-Harris plan. But the bad news is that, when it comes to nuclear power, the Biden camp has indeed chosen fiction over science.

In Promoting New Nuclear Power, Biden-Harris Back Fiction Over Science,  https://www.counterpunch.org/2020/11/13/in-promoting-new-nuclear-power-biden-harris-back-fiction-over-science/   BY LINDA PENTZ GUNTER  Although possibly a sad comment on his predecessors, incoming U.S. president, Joe Biden, is offering the most progressive climate policy so far of any who have previously held his position.

As Paul Gipe points out in his recent blog, the Biden-Harris climate plan uses the word “revolution” right in the headline — a bit of a departure from the usual cautious rhetoric of the centrist-controlled Democratic Party.

But ‘revolution’ is proceeded by two words which let us know we are still lingering in conservative ‘safe’ territory. They call it a “clean energy revolution”, which Gipe rightly refers to as “focus-group shopped terminology.” He goes on Continue reading

November 13, 2020 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Hibakusha renew their push for the abolition of nuclear weapons

Atomic bomb survivors’ renewed push for the abolition of nuclear weapons,   https://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/en/news/backstories/1370/   Kita Yusuke
NHK World Correspondent, Yoshida Mayu, NHK World Correspondent, 13 Nov 20,
Today is a big, memorable day for us.”

Hiroshima atomic bomb survivor Abe Shizuko was reacting to the October 24 ratification of the United Nations Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. The accord will take effect in January – although none of the world’s nuclear powers are members.

Nevertheless, hibakusha, which is what the atomic bomb survivors are called in Japan, see the treaty as a victory for their cause. “I take pride in the fact that the decision is a result of the united little voices of individual hibakusha,” says 93-year-old Abe.

On August 6th, 1945, the United States dropped an atomic bomb for the first time in human history. Its target was Hiroshima, where 18-year-old Abe was helping to dismantle buildings to prevent the spread of fires caused by air raids during World War Two. Abe was working just 1.5 kilometers away from ground zero. She suffered severe burns on the right side of her body and face, and has been through 18 surgeries.

“The operations were very painful and difficult. There wasn’t enough anesthetic back in those days, so doctors could not give me supplemental relief even if I started feeling pain. I tolerated the pain through a strong hope to restore my body,” Abe recalls.

The bomb left keloid scars on her face and the right side of her body. In photographs from when she was younger, Abe always looks down, or shows only her left side.

A-bomb survivors call the 10-year period following the world’s first atomic bombing “the blank decade.” That is because people who were injured had little to no medical or financial support. At the same time, they were exposed to severe prejudice and discrimination.

Abe says she was once nicknamed “Red Ogre” because of her scars. “My wound did not heal. My body weakened. I was in poverty. Many people stared at me only just to satisfy their curiosity, because they wanted to know what a hibakusha looked like. They did not feel sympathy for me. They bullied me. The suffering that I went through, and the emotional wound, will never go away.”

In 1956, Abe joined other atomic bomb survivors to form a delegation. They traveled to Tokyo to appeal to the then prime minister and government officials to offer relief for victims, and support their call for the abolition of nuclear weapons. Those efforts led to the establishment of the Japan Confederation of A- and H-Bomb Sufferers Organization.

As the Cold War progressed, the hibakusha became disheartened. Even though they were speaking out about the need to eliminate nuclear weapons, the world was not listening. Nuclear experiments were being carried out repeatedly, and the arms race took off.

“It was really a difficult time for our campaign,” Abe remembers. “We felt as if we were yelling out while trying to survive in rough waves on a dark night.”

Abe carried a grudge against the US, but started to feel a change of heart almost 20 years after the bombing. In 1964, she went to the US and Europe for what was known as the Peace Pilgrimage. It was an opportunity for A-bomb survivors to speak about their personal experiences in front of audiences. Abe stayed at a private home with local hosts in the US, and she was deeply touched by their tender-heartedness.

“They listened attentively to my stories and said to me, ‘It must have been very hard for you. You’ve been through a lot. We’re so sorry for you,'” Abe recalls. “I realized we should never let anyone fall victim to nuclear weapons, regardless of what nationality you are. Americans or anybody.”

The voices of the hibakusha spread to all corners of the world, slowly but steadily.

These days, the average age of hibakusha is more than 83 years old, and there are fewer chances to hear their direct accounts. Some of them, like Taniguchi Sumiteru, played a direct role in the recent ratification of the UN treaty that bans nuclear weapons.

Taniguchi died three years ago, but he put the wheels in motion with a campaign that collected signatures to demand an international convention to ban nuclear weapons. He worked on that until the last moment of his life.

Taniguchi was 16 when he was exposed to the second atomic bomb that the US dropped on Japan. He was working as a postman in Nagasaki. A picture that shows the red burned flesh on his back shocked the world.

He delivered an impassioned speech at the 2010 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty Review Conference at the UN’s New York headquarters: “Please don’t turn your eyes away from me. Please look at me again. I have survived miraculously, but for me, to ‘live’ was to ‘endure the agony’. Bearing the cursed scars of the atomic bomb all over our bodies, we the hibakusha continue to live in pain.”

“For humans to live as humans, not even one nuclear weapon should be allowed to exist on earth. I cannot die in peace until I witness the last nuclear warhead eliminated from this world,” said Taniguchi.

Hibakusha and their supporters gathered at Nagasaki Peace Park shortly after last month’s treaty ratification to share their joy. Among them was Okuma Yuka, a member of an activist group that calls itself “Hiroshima and Nagasaki Peace Messengers”.

Okuma took part in the signature-collecting campaign for the abolition of nuclear weapons after being deeply shocked by the image of a young Taniguchi in the aftermath of the atomic bombing. Her great-grandmother was a hibakusha but didn’t talk much about her experience. The photograph of Taniguchi brought it home to Okuma that suffering had occurred in her own family.

“I believe the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons is definitely an important step forward,” Okuma says. “I expect that this will become a good opportunity for us to move toward a world that is completely free of nuclear weapons.”

November 13, 2020 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Nuclear disarmament for health: time to rejoice — IPPNW peace and health blog

For decades people have marched, protested, sung songs, made films and written books calling for the abolition of nuclear weapons, and for decades the nuclear weapons states have stymied all efforts to force them to disarm. …The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons is very explicit. There can be no misinterpretation or waffling on its provisions. It prohibits the development, testing, production, stockpiling, transfer, use and threat of use of nuclear weapons. It also prohibits countries giving assistance and encouragement to the prohibited activities. Finally, any direct or indirect control over nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices is forbidden.

Nuclear disarmament for health: time to rejoice — IPPNW peace and health blog

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

November 13 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion: ¶ “Hitting Net Zero Is Not Enough – We Must Restore The Climate” • The climate crisis is here now. No matter how quickly we reach zero emissions, the terrible impacts of the climate crisis will not just go away. They will continue to cause millions to suffer for centuries to come. Just cutting […]

November 13 Energy News — geoharvey

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New wind and solar farms begin production in NSW — RenewEconomy

Molong solar farm welcomed to the NSW grid this week, alongside the Sunraysia solar farm, the Collector wind farm, and the Wellington solar farm. The post New wind and solar farms begin production in NSW appeared first on RenewEconomy.

New wind and solar farms begin production in NSW — RenewEconomy

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Kill Cogati: Wind and solar sector urges ESB to drop “wrong reform at wrong time” — RenewEconomy

The clean energy sector has urged the Energy Security Board to finally kill-off the controversial COGATI reforms once and for all. The post Kill Cogati: Wind and solar sector urges ESB to drop “wrong reform at wrong time” appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Kill Cogati: Wind and solar sector urges ESB to drop “wrong reform at wrong time” — RenewEconomy

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

BoM wake up call: Record warming leading to more extreme heat, drought and fires — RenewEconomy

BoM issues wake up call with latest ‘State of the Climate’ report, warning Australia on track for more extreme heat, bushfires and coral reef destruction. The post BoM wake up call: Record warming leading to more extreme heat, drought and fires appeared first on RenewEconomy.

BoM wake up call: Record warming leading to more extreme heat, drought and fires — RenewEconomy

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Victoria called on to ditch “outdated” network fees making EV fast-chargers unviable — RenewEconomy

Victorian government called on to intervene over ‘out-dated’ network access fees, that could jeopardise the roll-out of new EV fast-chargers. The post Victoria called on to ditch “outdated” network fees making EV fast-chargers unviable appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Victoria called on to ditch “outdated” network fees making EV fast-chargers unviable — RenewEconomy

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Clean energy sector concerned new foreign relations laws could kill investment — RenewEconomy

Clean energy sector raises concerns that new foreign investment laws could impose new regulatory burdens on wind and solar projects, and stymie new investment. The post Clean energy sector concerned new foreign relations laws could kill investment appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Clean energy sector concerned new foreign relations laws could kill investment — RenewEconomy

November 13, 2020 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment