Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

The week in nuclear news – to 31 August

The tragic situation in Afghanistan dominated the news.

In the USA, Hurricane Ida reminds of the effects of global heating – increasing the intensity of extreme weather.

The mainstream media carefully avoids discussion of the dangers to Louisiana’s nuclear power stations.

Coronavirus. For most of the world, the pandemic is not over – devastation in countries such as Uganda, Indonesia, India, Nepal, Peru and Brazil.


Climate.   Even 1.5C warming will still leave world’s coasts exposed to extremes. Radio Ecoshock re-examines the facts on the new megafires. 


Hard to find good news – mostly very individualistic stories, like these ones about bees:  A friend bumblebee.  Saving the bees. A bit of good news (sort of)  University of Michigan reports that CO2 can be stored away in concrete,

AUSTRALIA. 

 Federal nuclear waste dump plan.  Australia’s nuclear waste is best managed in interim storage at Lucas Heights, with an independent review on permanent disposal.  The status of two current federal processes related to radioactive waste and the Kimba plan.  Farmer Jeff Baldock is excited at prospect of nuclear waste dump on his land. Other nearby farmers not impressed, (Stock Journal).. Also, Stock Journal inaccurate on Baldock’s land area.    Kimba nuclear waste dump consultation? WHAT CONSULTATION

Need to investigate ANSTO’s tax-payer funded, loss-making, unnecessary nuclear medicine production

Climate activists raided by anti-terrorist police. Their crime? chalking a sign on pavement. Canberra Extinction Rebellion members convicted by ACT Magistrates Court for crimes during protests. 


Australia’s biggest climate poll shows support for action in every seat

Tasmania Liberals vote down Greens climate emergency motion with Premier claiming it ‘frightens’ children. Political bribes beat the planet as gas fracking gets public hand-outs.

White Man’s Media: Rupert Murdoch and the US Imperium– Australia is its tool.

Development of ‘zombie’ gasfield areas would create waste, water issues: opponents


As the world battles to slash carbon emissions, Australia considers paying dirty coal stations to stay open longer

Nationals v CSIRO: why a party of government attacks its own scientific agency 

Australian Labor Party backs bills to de-register most political parties.

INTERNATIONAL.

29 August 2021 International Day Against Nuclear Tests https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C5PRZh_C0e4  Reaffirm commitment to ban nuclear tests, UN chief says in message for International Day.

How to remember Hiroshima and Nagasaki – Sign the nuclear weapons treaty.   Humanitarian Impacts of Nuclear Weapons. Shadow World reveals the shocking realities of the global arms trade – the only business that counts its profits in billions and its losses in human lives

Weaponising space -the high road to World War 3, but profitable for weapons and space companies. Exposure to radiation can affect DNA: Astronauts on long-duration missions in space at risk .   Rocket launches may be damaging the ozone layer

Military Contractor CACI Says Afghanistan Withdrawal Is Hurting Its Profits. It’s Funding a Pro-War Think Tank.

Nuclear energy is anything but clean, despite the media hype.

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Christina reviews | Leave a comment

Inaccuracy on the land area for Napandee nuclear waste dump

After a somewhat shaky attempt by the Editor to recant the very convincing result in the Stock Journal last week, another Stock Journal article has just been released supposedly showing both sides of the argument regarding the proposed nuclear dump. Seems Mr Baldock doesn’t actually know how much land is involved- 158 hectares is NOT the size according to OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS – so what ELSE is being said which is considered being “flexible with the truth” do you think, putting it nicely? Good interview again however by Peter Woolford.

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Federal nuclear waste dump, South Australia | Leave a comment

Farmer Jeff Baldock excited at prospect of nuclear waste dump on his land. Other nearby farmers not impressed


Lobbyists get ready to fight site approval, Stock Journal , Vanessa Binks, 28 Aug 2020   AFTER more than six years of deliberation, a regional radioactive waste storage site is less than 60 days away from potential approval and the site’s owner believes the long road has been “worth it”.

The site at Napandee, near Kimba, was selected for final approval by federal Resources Minister Keith Pitt earlier this month.Landowner and mixed farmer Jeff Baldock said the approval of the site could save the town, and found the announcement of further consultation “frustrating”.

The 158-hectare property is less than 2 per cent of Mr Baldock’s arable farming land [this figure is disputed] and the development is expected to provide a $8.5-million benefit to the community.”There is nothing else to consult about. The proposal has already survived two Senate inquiries and been scrutinised by a Parliamentary Committee and through a court process,” he said.”There has already been multiple rounds of consultation and another one will just cause delays.”

Mr Baldock said offering his land to store radioactive waste was “not about money”…….. 

“Country towns are diminishing and Kimba has an opportunity to invest in its future and keep families or attract more residents,” Mr Baldock said.

Site construction could begin by 2024.

Lobbyists get ready to fight site approval A DIVISION within the Kimba community about whether or not a local radioactive waste site should be approved has spearheaded a response from the No Radioactive Waste on Agricultural Land in Kimba group to challenge the final approval in a judicial review process.

The committee will be meeting in the coming weeks to discuss the next stages after the recently announced further 60-day consultation period has lapsed.

Lobby group president Peter Woolford said all options would be examined going forward.”We are another step closer to SA becoming a dumping ground and one step closer to another court case,” he said.

Mr Woolford was pleased about the announcement of further consultation and hoped those who disapproved of the site would voice their concerns.”I hope that people outside of the Kimba District Council are allowed to have their say this time – particularly neighbouring councils at Cleve and Wudinna who are also affected,” he said.
Mr Woolford also said agriculture’s economic benefit to the region far exceeded the benefit from the development.”About $60 million worth of income is generated from agriculture in the district each year – this development will not even come close to that and it could impact agriculture’s future in the area as well,” he said.”The risk is too unknown.

August 30, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, Federal nuclear waste dump | Leave a comment

Hurricane Ida threatens 2 nuclear power stations in Louisiana

Two Nuclear Plants In Ida’s Path As Storm Expected At Cat 4, Simply Info,   [excellent pictures and maps]

Hurricane Ida is expected to hit the US as a category 4 storm. The Weather Channel projects Sunday night landfall and a direct hit on Louisiana. Storm surges in the area range from the Texas border to Mobile Alabama.

Two nuclear power plants are in the direct storm path. River Bend and Waterford. Waterford sits near the mouth of the Mississippi and in the zone of the highest expected storm surge. Current estimates have a 10-15 foot surge expected for that area. This could be potentially more severe as the storm pushes water up the Mississippi River. Waterford sits about 24 miles from the mouth of the river and is next to Lake Pontchartrain……………..more http://www.simplyinfo.org/?p=19660

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Reaffirm commitment to ban nuclear tests, UN chief says in message for International Day, 

Nuclear weaponss test crater Kazakhstan

Reaffirm commitment to ban nuclear tests, UN chief says in message for International Day,  UN News 29 Aug 21  Countries which have not yet ratified the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) are urged by UN Secretary-General António Guterres to do so without delay.
The UN chief made the appeal in his message for the International Day Against Nuclear Tests, observed on Sunday, 29 AugustThe UN chief made the appeal in his message for the International Day Against Nuclear Tests, observed on Sunday, 29 August

The date marks the 30th anniversary of the closure of the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan, the largest of its kind in the former Soviet Union, where more than 450 nuclear devices were exploded over four decades.

Terrible consequences

Mr. Guterres said nuclear tests caused enormous human suffering and environmental damage.

They had terrible consequences on the health of people living in affected areas.  Many were relocated from their ancestral lands, disrupting their lives and livelihoods.  Pristine environments and ecosystems were destroyed, which will take decades, if not centuries, to heal.”

The closure of the Semipalatinsk test site signaled the end of the era of unrestrained nuclear testing, said Mr. Guterres.  Soon afterwards, countries began negotiating the CTBT.

The treaty bans all explosive nuclear weapons tests anywhere, by any country, he added, effectively “putting a brake on the nuclear arms race and providing a powerful barrier to the development of new nuclear weapons.”

No excuse

The CTBT was adopted in 1996 and has been signed by 185 countries, and ratified by 170, including three nuclear weapon States.  However, it must be signed and ratified by 44 specific nuclear technology holder countries before it can enter into force……………….


Threat still real: Kazakhstan Ambassador

The threat that nuclear weapons pose to the world remains “as realistic as ever”, said Kazakhstan’s Ambassador to the UN, Magzhan Ilyassov, speaking to UN News ahead of the International Day (interview here and at right). 

“For us, the 29th of August is not a day in the calendar. It is a reminder about how traumatic nuclear tests can be for humankind because in Kazakhstan alone, 1.5 million people still suffer, and will unfortunately suffer for future generations, from genetic diseases, cancer, leukaemia, which were caused by exposure to nuclear tests.”

Mr. Ilyassov said the total impact of the nuclear explosions carried out at the Semipalatinsk site was “1,200 times more” than the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, during the Second World War.

“The test site itself is of the size of Israel, so it’s a big chunk of the territory of Kazakhstan and that cannot be used for any other purpose like agriculture for many, many decades now,” he said, adding “so with that, we can also project what was the damage caused by other nuclear test sites around the world which were eventually closed.”  https://news.un.org/en/story/2021/08/1098682

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

29 August 2021 International Day Against Nuclear Tests

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Regional voters reject gas led recovery, support investment in renewables — RenewEconomy

New survey confirms that some of the Morrison government’s most ardent supporters of coal and gas are largely out of step with the views of their own electorates. The post Regional voters reject gas led recovery, support investment in renewables appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Regional voters reject gas led recovery, support investment in renewables — RenewEconomy

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

”Every euro invested in nuclear power makes the climate crisis worse’ 

Every euro invested in nuclear power makes the climate crisis worse’  https://www.dw.com/en/nuclear-climate-mycle-schneider-renewables-fukushima/a-56712368 29 Aug 21

Can nuclear energy help us meet climate goals? The editor of the World Nuclear Industry Status Report, Mycle Schneider, says no. He explains his stance to DW.

And if we’re talking about the construction of new power plants, then nuclear power is simply excluded. Not just because it is the most expensive form of electricity generation today, but, above all, because it takes a long time to build reactors. In other words, every euro invested in new nuclear power plants makes the climate crisis worse because now this money cannot be used to invest in efficient climate protection options.

As Japan marks the 10th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, the global conversation around the merits of using nuclear power to tackle the climate crisis remains hot. Many environmentalists are opposed, pointing to the risk of nuclear meltdowns and the difficulty of properly disposing of nuclear waste.

However, it has been championed by others for its ability to produce huge amounts of carbon-free energy. DW spoke to Mycle Schneider, editor of the annual World Nuclear Industry Status Report (WNISR), which assesses the status and trends of the global nuclear power industry. 

DW: The goal is to keep global warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit). What role can nuclear power play?

Mycle Schneider: Today we need to put the question of urgency first. It’s about how much we can reduce greenhouse gases and how quickly for every euro ($1.21) spent. So, it’s a combination between cost and feasibility, while doing it in the fastest possible way.

And if we’re talking about the construction of new power plants, then nuclear power is simply excluded. Not just because it is the most expensive form of electricity generation today, but, above all, because it takes a long time to build reactors. In other words, every euro invested in new nuclear power plants makes the climate crisis worse because now this money cannot be used to invest in efficient climate protection options.

What about existing nuclear power plants?

The power plants exist, they provide electricity. However, many of the measures needed for energy efficiency are now cheaper than the basic operating costs of nuclear power plants. That is the first point, and unfortunately it is always forgotten.

The second point is that renewables today have become so cheap that in many cases they are below the basic operating costs of nuclear power plants.

Let me give you two examples: The world’s lowest price for solar power in currently in Portugal, at 1.1 cents per kilowatt hour. And we now have the first results from Spain with costs for wind and solar power at around 2.5 cents per kilowatt hour. These are below the basic operating costs of the vast majority of nuclear power plants around the world.

It would often even be affordordable to pay 1 – 1.5 cents per kilowatt hour for electricity storage in addition to the generation costs for wind and solar power and still be below the operating costs of nuclear power plants. And here we have to ask the same question: How many emissions can I avoid with one euro, one dollar or one yuan?

So why are construction projects being announced now?

n the case of nuclear power, I often have the feeling that Trumpism prevails. Facts no longer matter. There is talk of plans and projects all over the place, but in reality, little or nothing actually happens. We document this in detail every year in the more than 300 pages of our World Nuclear Industry Status Report.

What sort of interests are behind this?

These are very clear self-interests. If the industry doesn’t launch phantom projects, then it will die even faster.

Why do politicians go along with it?

There are different interests here. During a visit to the Le Creusot forge in December 2020, for example, French President [Emmanuel] Macron made it clear that there are also military strategic interests in maintaining the nuclear industry. And France has never made a secret of the links between military and civil interests when it comes to nuclear.

In other countries like China there are different interests. China is funding infrastructure in a large number of countries through its Belt and Road Initiative, also known as the New Silk Road. This is geopolitics on a grand scale.

The co-financing of the Hinkley Point C nuclear power plant in Great Britain, for example, puts this into context. In this case, the fact that it is an inefficient project is irrelevant. The scale of Chinese infrastructure investments is huge. There’s talk of $1,000 billion (€821 billion). That means: You have to look at each country, because each country has their own self-interests.

What other interests do energy companies have in continuing to operate unprofitable reactors?

The main reason is that an operating nuclear power plant generates income. As soon as a nuclear power plant is decommissioned, liabilities appear in the balance sheet and additional expenses appear.

You can see an example of this in Japan. If often took years to officially close nuclear power plants because companies could not afford to remove these plants from their assets. Some of these operators would have gone bankrupt overnight.

There’s no doubt that energy companies like EDF in France face a serious financial crisis. The question is, how will they survive this? Certainly not without the help of massive state subsidies in the long term. But as long as they can keep earning money, even if it’s no longer profitable, investing in demolition and waste management isn’t a consideration.

How much does demolition cost?

In the order of €1 billion per reactor. In France, only a third of [the required funds] have been put aside. This means the problem starts once the reactors go offline.

What about the costs of the storage of high-level radioactive waste?

No one knows how much this really costs, because there is no functioning permanent storage facility.

Is there any chance of a permanent storage facility being operational in the future?

There is currently no operational permanent storage facility. The most advanced projects are in Finland and Sweden. However, the concept there is based on a design from the early 1980s, with storage in copper containers. However, recent research has shown that the copper containers are significantly more susceptible to corrosion than first thought. That means the viability of commissioning one of these facilities in Sweden or Finland is still totally unclear. It’s the same situation for other countries. They are even further behind on development or they don’t even have storage models, let alone locations.

How far along in this process are countries in Asia?

In Japan there is still no storage location or model. The same goes for Korea. In China they’re discussing whether or not nuclear waste should be reprocessed. That’s even further away.

Basically, these countries behave just like countries in the West where the nuclear power plants were built two or three decades ago. That means there is no advanced planning in place and no coherent concept as to how their highly radioactive nuclear waste should be stored for eternity.

Mycle Schneider is the initiator and lead author of the annual World Nuclear Industry Status Report, an independent reference report on the development of the global nuclear power industry. Schneider is an independent consultant to governments and international organizations around the world. In 1997 he was awarded the Alternative Nobel Prize (Right Livelihood Award).

This interview was conducted by Gero Rueter and adapted into English by Ineke Mules.

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Australia’s biggest climate poll shows support for action in every seat


Australia’s biggest climate poll shows support for action in every seat

The survey of 15,000 Australians found 67pc believe the government should do more to tackle climate change, including a majority in all 151 national seats.

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

August 29 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion: ¶ “Louisiana Hasn’t Yet Recovered From Two Major Hurricanes In 2020. Now Another Is Taking Aim” • Five named storms struck Louisiana in 2020. Two of them were major hurricanes, doing a total of $18.75 billion in damages. As the state still reels from the destruction, another major hurricane is now barreling toward the […]

August 29 Energy News — geoharvey

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

August 28 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion: ¶ “A Carbon Tax That Sends Americans Checks Could Pass This Fall: Interview” • The Senate will be voting on a reconciliation package soon. One of the things in that package is a proposed carbon tax that would actually use the funds from the carbon tax to create jobs, grow the economy, and even […]

August 28 Energy News — geoharvey

August 30, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment