Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

USA Bill to protect journalists – EXCEPT FOR JULIAN ASSANGE

press freedom advocates, while supportive of the press freedom bill, said that the legislation would yield the biggest impact if the U.S. followed its own policies.

“Anytime we, or the U.S. government, or members of Congress are talking about press freedom internationally, it’s, in my mind, a good thing,” said Trevor Timm, co-founder and executive director of the Freedom of the Press Foundation. “But for any of that advocacy to be remotely effective, it’s important for the U.S. to walk the walk and not just talk the talk.”

PRESS FREEDOM BILL WOULD PROTECT JOURNALISTS FACING PERSECUTION — BUT NOT JULIAN ASSANGE  https://theintercept.com/2021/09/08/julian-assange-international-press-freedom-act/ 8 Sept21,

Senators say they want to protect foreign journalists from government aggression. But what happens when the U.S. is the aggressor? Rose Adams

September 8 2021, EARLIER THIS YEAR, just days before World Press Freedom Day, Sens. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., joined forces to introduce the International Press Freedom Act of 2021, a bipartisan bill to protect at-risk journalists working in highly censored countries. The legislation is predicated on the idea that the United States is a uniquely safe place for journalists — but that notion doesn’t always hold up under scrutiny.

Introduced on April 29, the International Press Freedom Act is one of at least three press freedom bills that Congress has considered since Saudi authorities killed journalist Jamal Khashoggi in October 2018. But while other bills have proposed piecemeal protections — such as sanctions on restrictive governments or a government office for threatened journalists — Kaine and Graham’s bill takes a more comprehensive approach. In addition to directing State Department funds toward investigating and prosecuting crimes against journalists abroad, the law would create a new visa category for threatened reporters and open a State Department office with a $30 million annual fund to help journalists report safely or relocate.

Press advocacy groups such as the Committee to Protect Journalists have praised Kaine and Graham’s bill, claiming that the legislation would “bolster U.S. foreign diplomacy on global press freedom.” In a statement, Kaine emphasized the U.S.’s responsibility to spread its free speech ethos.

“Enshrined in both our Constitution and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, press freedom is a core American value that we must constantly promote around the globe,” he said in a press release. “With this bill, our country will let journalists know that we will protect their right to report and offer safe harbor when they are threatened.”

But that safe harbor doesn’t seem to apply to foreign journalists the U.S. government itself has threatened. For years, the Justice Department has worked to extradite and prosecute WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for publishing Army war logs provided by Chelsea Manning in 2010, and increased the pressure following his 2016 publication leaked Democratic Party emails that the Justice Department said were hacked by Russia. And though the government’s extradition efforts are inching closer to fruition amid several U.S. appeals, Kaine and Graham have remained silent.

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September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sloppy and unconvincing pro nuclear propaganda from the Australian Nationals and the Murdochracy

The Australian nuclear promotion is less persuasive. Coming predominantly from Murdoch media, the content of nuclear propaganda is sloppy, inaccurate, and at times downright weird

The Nationals and Murdoch media support nuclear power ahead of COP26, Independent Australia,By Noel Wauchope | 9 September 2021.

On 1 September 2021, Senator Matt Canavan called for Australia to boycott the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26) to be held in Glasgow in November. 

Was he speaking on behalf of the coal or oil industries? Well, not exactly. 

This was the latest and strangest call from Australia’s noisy little band of pro-nuclear promoters. Canavan was responding to the news that the nuclear industry has been banned from having exhibits at COP26. He complained that the Climate Summit was a ”sham” for excluding nuclear power, a view supported by MP Ken O’Dowd.

O’Dowd said that nuclear power should be at the top of the climate agenda. Other National Party notables, David Littleproud and Bridget McKenzie, recently spoke out for nuclear power.

Like the nuclear industry worldwide, they are now taking up the cause of climate action with a vengeance. The nuclear lobby’s motives are clear. First, they likely want the tax exemptions and other subsidies that come with being declared as clean and sustainable. Secondly, they need that seal of approval, the public respectability which goes with acquiring the clean and green label.

The global lobby’s most persuasive argument is that a nuclear reactor’s operation generates a lot of electricity, with only a minuscule production of CO2

They don’t, of course, talk about the processes of the nuclear fuel chain from uranium mining through to demolition of dead reactors and disposal of wastes. Their favourite phrase ”emissions-free energy” doesn’t count emissions of radioactive strontium-90.

The Australian nuclear promotion is less persuasive. Coming predominantly from Murdoch media, the content of nuclear propaganda is sloppy, inaccurate, and at times downright weird. The Australian newspaper provides two outstanding examples

The first is this eye-catching article Savvy activists cast nuclear benefits in a fresh green light  subtitled:

‘For baby boomers, nuclear weapons and nuclear energy were conflated as an existential risk. This created an irrational fear that persists today.’

From the outset, the argument is an attack on anti-nuclear activists, instead of arguing the case for nuclear power.

The hero of the piece is Zion Lights, formerly of Extinction Rebellion, who created her own pro-nuclear group, Emergency Reactor.

She works closely with Michael Shellenberger, who, himself, has lost the support of the general nuclear lobby, due to his many inaccurate statements. Zion Lights and The Australian go into a lengthy digression on the foibles of the baby boomers, who have ‘conflated nuclear weapons and nuclear energy as an existential risk that could wipe out humanity’.

The health effects of the Chernobyl and Fukushima disasters are minimised and renewable energy is rubbished as being ineffective.

The author, Claire Lehmann, concludes that the too-slow movement towards carbon neutrality is the fault of the misguided anti-nuclear baby boomers.

The second article is ‘Nuclear stacks up — cue the meltdown‘ by Greg Sheridan, who starts by accusing Australians as being ‘environmental outliers’ for prohibiting nuclear power…………..

the main thrust of this pro-nuclear argument moves on to an attack on Labor, the Greens and so forth:

‘… the deadly, wretched, wholly negative, nihilistic scare campaigns and demonising that the ALP left and its Green allies have conducted against nuclear energy.’

There is no attempt to address any of the worrying issues that surround nuclear power  costs, safety, environmental damage, radioactive waste. He reminds us that Bill Gates backs nuclear power. Well of course Gates does  he owns a nuclear power company, Terra Power.

He also quotes the European Union (EU) as backing nuclear power. While several EU countries do have nuclear power, the EU as a whole is not recommending nuclear powers as a climate solution. In fact, the nuclear industry is banned from exhibiting at the green zone at COP26………

As I write this comes the breathtaking news that the Murdoch media is changing its attitude to global warming. From a rather crude sort of climate denialism, they will likely move to supporting technical “climate fixes” spruiked by the fossil fuel industries. This is a more subtle way of sabotaging real climate action. 

Perhaps we can expect them also to provide something more credible on the nuclear issue in the future. https://independentaustralia.net/environment/environment-display/the-nationals-and-murdoch-media-support-nuclear-power-ahead-of-cop26,15496

September 9, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, climate change - global warming, media, politics | Leave a comment

Senator Matt Canavan – a chameleon of contradictions on coal and nuclear power

One minute all for coal, the next it’s nuclear. Can you believe a word this guy says?

Resources Minister Matt Canavan has hosed down the prospect of nuclear power helping solve the nation’s energy woes, saying the disposal of low-level radioactive waste was already a problem.

Canavan cold on the push for nuclear powerhttps://www.afr.com/companies/energy/canavan-cold-on-the-push-for-nuclear-power-20190903-p52nir?fbclid=IwAR2dHiUWJ4cplt9pkNCTfajuqpIYTGoaCzMTWoirS2N2dpVTy2hOJllIhqgMark Ludlow

While there has been a push for nuclear energy to replace coal-fired power stations when they finally exit the National Energy Market, the pro-coal Queensland senator said he had his doubts, saying it was still too expensive and did not have bipartisan support.

The issue of disposal of radioactive waste was still a major hurdle to overcome, he said.

Senator Canavan said he was the minister responsible for trying to find a home for low and intermediate-level radioactive waste from the sole nuclear reactor at Lucas Heights in Sydney’s south-west that is used for the production of nuclear medicine.

We’ve been trying to find a home for 40 years for that waste. It’s difficult because of the concerns about managing that waste. I completely understand that,” he said before a speech to the Queensland Resources Media Club in Brisbane.

“Obviously, if we can’t find a long-term solution for that level of waste it’s pretty hard to fathom that we could go beyond that for the production of nuclear energy that does produce a larger amount and more waste of a higher category to manage.”

………. Pro-nuclear advocates say next-generation smaller nuclear reactors could be built for about $2.7 billion each. Other sceptics say nuclear power would not be viable for another 20 years – and only if there were some form of carbon price.


But Senator Canavan said despite the inquiry and the support of some prominent conservative politicians, he had reservations about the price of nuclear power. ”No one is going to make predictions about what happens in 20, 30 or 40 years’ time. All I want to see is a system which allows the most affordable and sustainable energy solutions coming forward,” he said.

“I have previously expressed that it’s relatively expensive and, obviously, we do have a task at hand domestically at the moment to get down our high power prices.

“We’re not afraid of the discussions or conversations and we have rightly said any change would have to be bipartisan, which is unlikely right now.”

Talking up coal

Senator Canavan talked up the prospects of coal exports………….https://www.afr.com/companies/energy/canavan-cold-on-the-push-for-nuclear-power-20190903-p52nir?fbclid=IwAR2dHiUWJ4cplt9pkNCTfajuqpIYTGoaCzMTWoirS2N2dpVTy2hOJllIhqgMark Ludlow

September 9, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics | Leave a comment

Australia is part of Asia, and is unwise and unsafe in parroting the USA agression about China.

As tensions rise with China, Australia is ‘not so safe’, warns Mahathir,
more  https://www.theage.com.au/world/asia/as-tensions-rise-with-china-australia-is-not-so-safe-warns-mahathir-20210907-p58pmg.html-, BChris Barrett, September 9, 2021 ,

What is happening now is, of course, people regard Australia almost as an extension of America,” said the 96-year-old. “Your policies are seldom different from America.

Singapore: Australia is needlessly risking its security with a standoff with China, says former Malaysian prime minister Mahathir Mohamad, who claims Canberra must make the first move to settle tensions with Beijing.

In an interview with The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age, Mahathir also attacked the use of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue – comprising the US, Australia, Japan and India – as a vehicle to try and stand up to China.

He believes it risks provoking Xi Jinping’s regime and that rallying countries together against the Chinese Communist Party is not the way to raise concerns about its behaviour, from its claims to most of the South China Sea to alleged human rights abuses in Xinjiang province.

“It is an aggressive move,” Mahathir said.

“We should have just bilateral relations with countries without any appearance of trying to force our policies on China. Yes, of course, we are unhappy about the treatment of the Uighurs. But for Malaysia, we can’t fight against China. We have to continue to work with them and try to influence them in a small way so that they will treat the Uighurs better.”

Australia’s ties with China remain at an all-time low as Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Defence Minister Peter Dutton embark on a diplomatic tour this week with visits to Jakarta, Seoul, Delhi and Washington DC.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg is foreshadowing a further rising of tension with China, declaring Australia will not compromise on its “core values” even in the midst of damaging economic coercion.

However, Mahathir, who led Malaysia between 1981 and 2003 and from 2018 to 2020, argues Australia is largely responsible for turning its differences with China into a full-blown diplomatic and trade dispute.

“What is happening now is, of course, people regard Australia almost as an extension of America,” said the 96-year-old. “Your policies are seldom different from America. And America is aggressive because it thinks it is safe. But Australia is not so safe.

“This idea that Australia is part of Europe is still there. You don’t think you are an eastern nation but over time you have to think that you are here. Therefore, what policies you follow must take into consideration your geographical position. But when you just reflect the policies of America sometimes, of course, it will not work because you are not as safe and powerful as America.”

The Australian government has been trying to reopen a dialogue with China for months to no avail, with Beijing still incensed by issues it laid out in a list of 14 grievances it released last November.

They include Australia’s call for an independent probe into the origins of COVID-19, the blocking of Huawei from the 5G network in 2018, Australia’s prominence in an international “crusade” on Taiwan, Hong Kong and Xinjiang and the barring of multiple Chinese investment deals on the grounds of national security.

China was further angered by the cancellation in April of Victoria’s Belt and Road Initiative agreement under the Australian government’s new foreign veto laws.


It has retaliated with continuing sanctions against Australian exports including coal, barley and wine while demanding Australia walk back some of its policies on China.

n 2018, Mahathir himself pushed back against $22 billion in contracts Malaysia had signed with China’s Belt and Road Initiative under predecessor Najib Razak, who has since been found guilty of corruption over the country’s 1MDB sovereign wealth fund scandal.

Warning China could secure influence with debt traps, he renegotiated the terms of the East Coast Rail Link, the signature Belt and Road project in Malaysia, to save a third of the cost but says he did so because it was a bad deal not because it was Chinese.

Mahathir believes Australia needs to loosen restrictions on Chinese investment.

“The country which first made the move should also make the move to reduce that tension,” he said. “And for that, you should remove the restrictions you have on Chinese products. Maybe having Huawei coming in to Australia is too dangerous. But you may think of other things.

“And slowly, I think the Chinese will respond by opening up the imports of Australian products. It may be a gradual process, but I think in the meantime, as you reduce the bans and all that you should also talk to the Chinese about human rights, about things you think they have done wrong.”

China will inevitably be high on the agenda in next week’s Australia-United States Ministerial (AUSMIN) talks between Payne, Dutton and their counterparts in President Joe Biden’s administration.

Australia and the US last week celebrated the 70th anniversary of the ANZUS Treaty, with US Defence Secretary Lloyd Austin saying the Western military power was committed to a “shared vision for a free and open Indo-Pacific” for decades to come.

The mode of the US exit from Afghanistan, however, has raised questions about its dependability as a security guarantor, particularly in a regional landscape in which China is increasingly assertive.

“Americans think of America first,” Mahathir said. “America is forever trying to help people but when the help is extended it’s in the interest of America, not in the interest of the country concerned.”

September 9, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics international | Leave a comment

South Australia to be first gigawatt scale grid to meet all demand with rooftop solar — RenewEconomy

In the next few months South Australia could become the first gigawatt scale grid in the world to meet all its demand from rooftop solar. The post South Australia to be first gigawatt scale grid to meet all demand with rooftop solar appeared first on RenewEconomy.

South Australia to be first gigawatt scale grid to meet all demand with rooftop solar — RenewEconomy

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

General Failure: How the U.S. Military Lied About the 9/11 Wars — limitless life

Peter Maass September 8 2021, 11:38 a.m. General Failure: How the U.S. Military Lied About the 9/11 Wars For generals like David Petraeus and Lloyd Austin, there has been no punishment for 20 years of disinformation on Afghanistan and Iraq. DONATE 1 Army Gen. David Petraeus is seen on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on April […]

General Failure: How the U.S. Military Lied About the 9/11 Wars — limitless life

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

UK trade deal: Morrison begins COP26 season by causing a major international mess — RenewEconomy

Australia’s eternal quest to protect its fossil fuel industry has caused an incredible and embarrassing international climate policy incident for the hosts of COP26. The post UK trade deal: Morrison begins COP26 season by causing a major international mess appeared first on RenewEconomy.

UK trade deal: Morrison begins COP26 season by causing a major international mess — RenewEconomy

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Huge wind, solar and battery project proposed for central Queensland — RenewEconomy

RES and Energy Estate propose a 900MW wind, solar and battery project, part of a plan for 2GW of renewables to support major industrial loads. The post Huge wind, solar and battery project proposed for central Queensland appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Huge wind, solar and battery project proposed for central Queensland — RenewEconomy

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

95 per cent of Australia’s coal must remain in ground to meet global climate targets — RenewEconomy

Virtually all of Australia’s coal reserves must go unburnt, and global fossil fuel use must peak ‘over next decade’, new research finds. The post 95 per cent of Australia’s coal must remain in ground to meet global climate targets appeared first on RenewEconomy.

95 per cent of Australia’s coal must remain in ground to meet global climate targets — RenewEconomy

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Great Solar Business Podcast: A US perspective on Australian solar — RenewEconomy

Benoy Thanjan, CEO and founder of Reneu Energy and host of the Solar Mavericks Podcast, spells out the similarities and the stark differences in how Australia and the US are adopting solar. The post Great Solar Business Podcast: A US perspective on Australian solar appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Great Solar Business Podcast: A US perspective on Australian solar — RenewEconomy

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘They Should Be In Jail’: How The Guardian and New York Times ‘Set Up’ Julian Assange

‘They Should Be In Jail’: How The Guardian and New York Times ‘Set Up’ Julian Assange  https://sputniknews.com/20190812/assange-set-up-davis-guardian-new-york-times-1076533649.html?fbclid=IwAR3TASTVrvLJZqXmcYK_7xQ79FzCd0BMeClw9B2uD549_bUDatl3dU9v2gA 10.09.2019)  Award-winning journalist Mark Davis has exposed the extent to which The Guardian and New York Times betrayed Julian Assange in 2010, and have played a pivotal and consciously dishonest role in smearing him ever since.

Speaking at an event in Sydney, Australia 8th August, Davis recalled how he’d closely followed Assange’s activities in the first half of that year in order to make a series of programmes on the WikiLeaks founder’s life for Australia’s Special Broadcasting Service – he ended up with so much material he was able to compile a documentary, ‘Inside WikiLeaks’. 

In particular, Davis was granted intimate insight into the release of the Afghan War Logs – 90,000 US military incident and intelligence reports compiled January 2004 – December 2009. Provided to WikiLeaks by Chelsea Manning, the files offered damning and previously hidden evidence of war crimes perpetrated by Allied forces in the country, including a number of extrajudicial killings.

Publication was ostensibly to be a collaborative effort in which WikiLeaks and a number of mainstream media outlets, most prominently The Guardian and New York Times, would work in concert curating the files and preparing them for publication – The Guardian went to the extent of establishing a dedicated operations room, dubbed “the bunker”, in order to facilitate the project.

Davis spent some time there, and feels his “eye-witness observations” serve to dynamite two “enduring slurs” against Assange’s character – namely, that he had a “cavalier” attitude towards the lives of individuals named in the documents his organisation released, and his lack of journalistic professionalism in comparison to the mainstream reporters with whom he collaborated. In fact, he suggests the reality is quite the reverse.

All the statements made by journalists he worked with in the books and articles they’ve written and TV shows they’ve appeared on about their integrity versus Julian’s lack thereof, I can say are complete lies. I’m witness to it. Nick Davies, Julian’s main contact at The Guardian, has repeatedly made the claim Julian had a cavalier attitude to human life – that’s simply not true. If there was any cavalier attitude, it was among Guardian journalists. They had disdain for the impact of this material, a type of ‘gallows humour’ as to what would happen those named in the documents if they were released,” Davis said.

He explained that at no point in the bunker did he see Guardian journalists “express any concern whatsoever” about putting people’s lives at risk, although Assange did do so on several occasions. Moreover, the issue of exposing the identities of thousands of people – an inevitable and obvious consequence of publishing tens of thousands of sensitive documents – was “never taken seriously” by the reporters involved, he alleges. 

Chillingly though, Davis claimed he did once witness a discussion between Davies and fellow reporter David Leigh – when Assange wasn’t present – about whether the name of a particular person should be published. Davies was steadfastly opposed, albeit purely out of fear of governmental reprisal, rather than anxieties over the individual in question’s safety.

“But we’re not publishing it,” Leigh allegedly responded – proof, Davis suggested, Assange hadn’t been chosen as The Guardian’s partner, but in fact a sacrificial lamb

“This was highly alarming to me, and I raised it with Julian. He’s a genius but has a certain naivety about him – he thought highly of these guys, felt they were part of a collective effort and all in it together, rather than him being the source and them being the journalists. He didn’t quite believe they’d push him out onto the plank, then say ‘it’s not us, we’re just reporters’. It’s shameful,” Davis said.

Leigh – who allegedly “fawned all over” Assange in the bunker – would go on to coauthor 2011’s WikiLeaks: Inside Julian Assange’s War on Secrecy with the notorious Luke Harding. Underlining Guardian journalists’ negligent approach to operational security, in that book the pair decided – contrary to Assange’s explicit warnings – to use the confidential encryption password for the entire, uncensored ‘Cablegate’ archive as a chapter heading, which resulted in the dumping of hundreds of thousands of State Department cables on the web without the selective redactions Assange and other WikiLeaks staffers had prepared for them over a period of eight months.

Walls Closing In

Davis went on to recall that as the War Logs’ mutually-agreed publication deadline loomed, both the Times and Guardian grew increasingly anxious about being associated with the material. His film, shot just prior to the release, documents this transformation in real-time – in one highly illuminating segment, Assange informs Gavin MacFayden, then-director of the University of London’s Centre for Investigative Journalism, the New York Times has requested WikiLeaks ‘scoop’ them by publishing analysis of the Afghan War Logs first.

The ‘naivety’ Davis referenced is palpably on display – “they want to report on our reporting, so they can claim they’re not involved!” Assange splutters bemusedly, in evident disbelief a newspaper would be actively resistant to publishing a seismic exclusive. As Davis attested, the footage makes for thoroughly “chilling” viewing in the present day, given Assange is “now in jail as a result of that subterfuge”.

Simultaneously, Assange himself was also growing increasingly anxious, in his case about the identities of informants and other individuals featured in the logs being revealed – no effort had been made by Guardian journalists to remove a single one, and despite repeated requests he wasn’t provided with staff or technical support to redact them. As a result, the WikiLeaks chief took up the “moral responsibility” for the files – his requests for publication to be delayed in order to give him enough time to adequately “cleanse” the documents were ignored, so he was compelled to “literally work all night” to redact around 10,000 names, Davis said.

In a perverse irony, the documentarian also exposed how despite Assange ultimately acquiescing to publishing the Logs Sunday 25th July 2010 in order to allow The Guardian and Times to ‘report’ on the story the next day, the plan was disrupted by technical issues with the WikiLeaks website.

As Assange struggled to get the content online, Davis said he was inundated with “panicked, hysterical calls” from The Times and Guardian, which grew more hysterical as the day wore on – the two outlets were literally on the verge of ‘stopping the presses’, as the front-page splashes on the Afghan War Logs were entirely predicated on the notion WikiLeaks had published the documents the day prior.

It would take several days for WikiLeaks to publish the War Logs – The Guardian and the Times nevertheless ran their scheduled stories on 26th July 2010, reporting on the release of the logs, despite the fact they hadn’t actually appeared on the WikiLeaks website.

Julian was their fall guy. They printed a lie. These two high priests of journalistic integrity very happily colluded, reporting on something that hadn’t happened. The entire searchable Afghan War Logs interface was the sole creation of The Guardian, they promoted it on their website and in the paper, but then they turned round and said ‘we didn’t publish this, Julian did’. They set him up from the start. They should be in jail too,” Davis concluded.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zok8yMxXEwk    AT TOP https://sputniknews.com/20190812/assange-set-up-davis-guardian-new-york-times-1076533649.html?fbclid=IwAR3TASTVrvLJZqXmcYK_7xQ79FzCd0BMeClw9B2uD549_bUDatl3dU9v2gA

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

TEPCO plan to discharge water relies on winning local trust — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Storage tanks holding treated contaminated water at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant complex on April 12 September 7, 2021 More than four months have passed since the government gave the green light to plans for Tokyo Electric Power Co. to release treated radioactive water from the crippled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear plant into […]

TEPCO plan to discharge water relies on winning local trust — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Legacies of Fukushima. — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Introduction Kyle Cleveland Abstract: This special collection of papers reflects the work of contributing authors to the newly released book Legacies of Fukushima: 3.11 in Context (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2021). The edited volume addresses the Fukushima nuclear crisis in Japan, taking a multi-dimensional, cross-disciplinary approach to understanding this epic disaster. The book is an […]

Legacies of Fukushima. — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

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Media Coverage of Fukushima, Ten Years Later — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Martin Fackler Abstract: When taking up the unlearned lessons of Fukushima, one of the biggest may have been the need for more robust oversight of the nuclear industry. In Japan, the failure of the major national news media to scrutinize the industry and hold it accountable was particularly glaring. Despite their own claims to serve […]

Media Coverage of Fukushima, Ten Years Later — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Commemoration and Meaning: The Case of Fukushima — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Robert Jay Lifton and Scott Gabriel Knowles Abstract: Disaster commemoration serves as a moment to remember victims and honor survivors. In the case of 3.11, commemoration works differently. As a slow disaster, with radiation exposure and evacuation at the center of the story, 3.11 is not yet over. This places special importance on commemoration as […]

Commemoration and Meaning: The Case of Fukushima — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

September 9, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment