Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

TV series ”Vigil” shows what life on board a nuclear submarine is like

What really happens on-board nuclear submarines, news.com.au 

With nuclear submarines making headlines in Australia, a new series has shown what life on-board is really like.Grant Rollings, The Sun September 18, 2021  Lurking in the dark depths of the seas for months on end, nuclear submarines are even more secretive than the SAS.

Known as the Silent Service, their whereabouts cannot be revealed, images of the hi-tech interiors are classified and crew never discuss their missions.

But now, thanks to the geniuses behind hit TV series Line Of Duty, the bizarre world of the submariner is being brought to the surface in gripping BBC drama Vigil, which streams locally on Binge.

The six-part murder mystery, which pulled in six million viewers for each of its first two episodes in the UK, sees British actress Suranne Jones play a detective sent to a nuclear sub to investigate a death.

But she struggles with the claustrophobia and psychological pressure of living in such a confined space.

Vigil’s set designers had to create their Vanguard-class sub without drawings or photos, because their interiors are so secret.

So how realistic is it? Royal Navy veteran Captain Mike Davis-Marks, who spent 36 years on submarines, says: “They’ve done a good job getting a lot of it right. I enjoyed it.”

The 63-year-old is also pleased the show is lifting the lid on the top secret world, one whose contribution to defence is often overlooked.

He says: “It is good to see what life is like inside a submarine, even if it is a drama. There has never been a fitting memorial. We have been too secretive.”

As the series is at pains to show, life on these expensive “cigar tubes” – which are 150m long and four decks high – can be extraordinarily tough.

Away for three months at a time, the crew are never allowed to communicate with the outside world unless there is an extreme emergency.

Sending out any signal will compromise a sub’s position, so that means no streaming, internet or social media.

Shifts are six hours on, six hours off, repeated constantly, seven days a week.And privacy on board is in short supply, with bunks stacked so close together your nose almost touches the one above.

Captain Mike, who commanded one of the nuclear-powered hunter-killer submarines tasked with seeking out the enemy, says: “Submariners work 24/7. Often, the only way to know what day it is, is by the food you are eating…………….. https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/streaming/what-really-happens-onboard-nuclear-submarines/news-story/2281442874cb66a6867541cc4b

What really happens on-board nuclear submarines, news.com.au 

With nuclear submarines making headlines in Australia, a new series has shown what life on-board is really like.Grant Rollings, The Sun4 min readSeptember 18, 2021  Lurking in the dark depths of the seas for months on end, nuclear submarines are even more secretive than the SAS.

Known as the Silent Service, their whereabouts cannot be revealed, images of the hi-tech interiors are classified and crew never discuss their missions.

But now, thanks to the geniuses behind hit TV series Line Of Duty, the bizarre world of the submariner is being brought to the surface in gripping BBC drama Vigil, which streams locally on Binge.

The six-part murder mystery, which pulled in six million viewers for each of its first two episodes in the UK, sees British actress Suranne Jones play a detective sent to a nuclear sub to investigate a death.

But she struggles with the claustrophobia and psychological pressure of living in such a confined space.

Vigil’s set designers had to create their Vanguard-class sub without drawings or photos, because their interiors are so secret.

So how realistic is it? Royal Navy veteran Captain Mike Davis-Marks, who spent 36 years on submarines, says: “They’ve done a good job getting a lot of it right. I enjoyed it.”

The 63-year-old is also pleased the show is lifting the lid on the top secret world, one whose contribution to defence is often overlooked.

He says: “It is good to see what life is like inside a submarine, even if it is a drama. There has never been a fitting memorial. We have been too secretive.”

As the series is at pains to show, life on these expensive “cigar tubes” – which are 150m long and four decks high – can be extraordinarily tough.

Away for three months at a time, the crew are never allowed to communicate with the outside world unless there is an extreme emergency.

Sending out any signal will compromise a sub’s position, so that means no streaming, internet or social media.

Shifts are six hours on, six hours off, repeated constantly, seven days a week.And privacy on board is in short supply, with bunks stacked so close together your nose almost touches the one above.

Captain Mike, who commanded one of the nuclear-powered hunter-killer submarines tasked with seeking out the enemy, says: “Submariners work 24/7. Often, the only way to know what day it is, is by the food you are eating…………….. https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/streaming/what-really-happens-onboard-nuclear-submarines/news-story/2281442874cb66a6867541cc4b

September 20, 2021 - Posted by | Uncategorized

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