Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Climate news, nuclear news – Australia and more

Realistically, COP26 could never be a great success, because each nation represented there has the top priority  of ”winning” – furthering its own interest. Such a summit can never succeed until the prevailing view is for the general good – for the planet and all its peoples.
Also realistically, the world has made extraordinary progress over recent years, in recognising the integral connections between climate change,  biodiversity loss and environmental degradation. At COP26, some significant steps have been taken. Not a success, perhaps,  but not a complete failure, either.

Honest Australian Government Ad | COP26 Climate Summit. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QIyKmqEdgR4

INTERNATIONAL

CLIMATE   Extreme weather events now the new normal – State of the Climate report 2021. Global emissions to surge past pre-Covid, as world fails to grasp ‘green recovery’.

  COP26.   Progress report on Glasgow climate talks.  Positive announcements at COP26 do give some hope. Glasgow will not get close to pledges to halve emissions by 2030 – warming will shoot past 2°CProspects of limiting global heating to 1.8C on the basis of commitmentsmade at the Cop26 climate summit are, though good, only “a hypothesis”. Despite all the criticism, the COP climate process has made historic steps forward. Cop26 week one: the impression of progress – but not nearly enough. Nation after nation at Glasgow pledges to abandon use of coalRallies in Glasgow and Sydney call for ‘survival of humanity’ in face of climate change  .

 Few willing to change lifestyle to save the planet, climate survey finds.   What the most affected regions need from COP26 — The Earthbound Report The role of efficiency and smart grids in conserving energy.  Positive developments: rise in electric cars, ever cheaper renewables, moves towards energy efficiency. Solar and wind keep getting cheaper, and crush coal, gas and nuclear on costs: Lazard.


Entering the Absurdicene as the Anthropocene loses its relevance — Sustainability Bites
  

 Nuclear at COP26.  Nuclear power, fossil fuel companies represented at COP26 climate talks.  Nuclear industry pushing its spin and doing deals on the sidelines at COP26/  Nuclear workers’ unions want nuclear energy included as clean and sustain able. ‘No One Died From Radiation At Fukushima’: IAEA Boss Statement Met With Laughter At COP26 .

Billionaires Not Morally Qualified to Shape Civilization. The need to stop population growth,and the way to go about this.

USA and UK’s transparent persecution of Australian Julian Assange. Chris Hedges: The Assange case is the most important battle for press freedom in our time.

A supporter of nuclear power has second thoughts. You don’t need nuclear to get to net zero,’ says climate professor Jeffrey Sachs.

Pandora Papers: is the world’s biggest leak the world’s biggest cover-up?

”Deep fakes”: corruption of data has worrying implications for nuclear policy.

Entering the Absurdicene as the Anthropocene loses its relevance — Sustainability Bites

UN ”Code of Conduct” towards preventing arms race in space, but no treaty banning weapons in space.

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AUSTRALIA.

  Australia at COP26 – a damaging presence. Australia’s credibility at a low point, with Scott Morrison’s lying and appalling performance at COP26.

Nuclear submarines.  Australia’s very awkward nuclear embrace. Lies, lies and nuclear submarinesUK Astute class nuclear submarine visits Perth. Australia’s Foreign Minister off to South East Asian countries to try to soothe their worries about nuclear submarinesChina reprimands Australia on AUKUS and submarines that risk nuclear weapons proliferation, and make Australia target. US and UK must stop’: Chinese diplomat warns New Zealand audience of Australia’s nuclear ambitions. Foreign Minister Marise Payne to visit South-East Asia to ease fears over AUKUS, submarine plan. Few realistic options for Defence to fill its submarine ‘capability gap’ before new nuclear fleet. Tony Abbott wants Australia to buy second-hand ”retired” nuclear-powered submarines, for training purposes. 

Russian deputy UN  envoy supports China’s concern on AUKUS’ nuclear threat.  

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Christina reviews | Leave a comment

Australia’s very awkward nuclear embrace

The very awkward nuclear embrace, Jon Faine,

https://www.smh.com.au/national/the-very-awkward-nuclear-embrace-20211105-p5969l.html   November 7, 2021 How can Scott Morrison just decide and announce – with no mandate or national debate whatsoever – that Australia is going to embrace nuclear technology?

One of the most impassioned and torrid domestic policy tussles of the last 50 years has suddenly been gazumped – after extensive secret discussions with top Americans and Brits but not a word with Australians. A fleet of Australian Navy nuclear-powered submarines, unimaginable just a few weeks ago, have been declared as integral to our future with barely a murmur.

The transition to and adoption of nuclear technology may well be the right call – my quibble is that we have not even had the courtesy of a national debate about the biggest technology shift in a generation.

Our Prime Minister no more readily engages in discussion about underwater matters than he did with “on water” matters as immigration minister. He has again stopped the boats – stopped the making of boats. The decades of policy paralysis on climate change has been matched by nearly 20 years of flip-flopping on replacing our vintage Collins Class subs.

We have long been a people committed to keeping nuclear technology at arms length. The British military in the 1950s used the Montebello islands off WA and the Pitjantjatjara lands of Maralinga in the South Australian outback to experiment with and test nuclear bombs.

It took a royal commission in 1985 to establish the causal link to an otherwise inexplicable rise in the rate of birth defects and cancers among the service personnel and local Indigenous communities impacted

The British soldiers involved were issued protective gear, but the Aussies were not. The authorities were indifferent – to say the least – to the safety of First Nations people, many of whom suffered terribly. Widespread community outrage followed.

Around the same time as that royal commission, regular huge street protests expressed our collective anger with – yes – France over their years of nuclear explosions at Mururoa Atoll in the Pacific Ocean.

When French secret service agents bombed the Greenpeace flagship the Rainbow Warrior in Auckland harbour in 1985 and killed Portuguese volunteer photographer Fernando Pereira, anti-French sentiment across Australia and NZ was palpable.

Sales of Citroens, Peugeots and Renaults suffered – while croissant and Camembert sales barely dipped.

Vigorous discussion has centred on whether PM Morrison ought to be apologising to President Macron. But what about an apology to the Australian people for ignoring our legitimate role in making one of the most significant decisions any government of this country will ever make? It is astonishing that any PM can make such a momentous decision without asking us first.

The ALP has pragmatically supported the new commitment to the AUKUS alliance and its essential ingredient of a commitment to nuclear-powered subs from either the USA or the UK instead of the French alternative.

Anthony Albanese is determined to deny the PM a “khaki election” and consistent with his small-target strategy, has all but ensured that the numbers are there in the Parliament to vote through the legislative changes required to embrace a technology that we have consistently rejected.

We have long embraced laws that prohibit nuclear proliferation. There are many on the left of the ALP who have profound disquiet about “going nuclear” but dare not say anything controversial as a federal poll approaches.

Has the Australian public changed their mind about embracing nuclear technology? The only real test has been in South Australia, which recently abandoned a plan for a lucrative nuclear waste program amid overwhelming opposition.

Germany and Japan are retreating from decades of relying on nuclear power, and post-Fukushima and Chernobyl, nuclear industry boosters have had to accept the commercial reality that their technology is uninsurable and unwelcome.

Defence insiders despair as the original submarine proposal for a German design to be built here for $20 billion morphed to Japanese-designed subs for $40 billion, then French designed but locally assembled subs for $50 billion and now $90 billion for subs that decades from now will be made in the USA or the UK. And this is supposed to be a better outcome?

Naval planners concede that the future use for submarines is as underwater mother-ships for a range of satellite autonomous submersible drones.

What Morrison has announced is no more than an idea for a plan for a proposal for a contract to splurge vast amounts of Australian taxpayer’s money overseas for technology that almost surely will be redundant by the time anything is delivered.

Naval planners concede that the future use for submarines is as underwater mother-ships for a range of satellite autonomous submersible drones.

What Morrison has announced is no more than an idea for a plan for a proposal for a contract to splurge vast amounts of Australian taxpayer’s money overseas for technology that almost surely will be redundant by the time anything is delivered.

November 8, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics international | Leave a comment

Russian deputy UN  envoy supports China’s concern on AUKUS’ nuclear threat

Russian deputy UN envoy supports China’s concern on AUKUS’ nuclear threat
By Global Times  Russia supported the concerns voiced by China on AUKUS, the new tripartite defense alliance formed with the intention of intimidating China, at a recent meeting of the UN General Assembly’s First Committee, saying that they are legitimate concerns as this kind of cooperation is related to the nuclear field and clearly has a military dimension.

More time and information are needed in order to respond properly to the trilateral nuclear cooperation, Russian Deputy Permanent Representative to the UN Office and Other International Organizations in Geneva Andrei Belousov, who represented Russia at recent meetings of the UN General Assembly’s First Committee in New York, was quoted as saying in Russian media reports.  …………

He noted that ASEAN countries also expressed serious concerns at the First Committee’s session as they viewed AUKUS as a threat to regional security. In particular, the delegations of Indonesia and Malaysia said that the implementation of the initiative might trigger an arms race in the region. 

The trilateral partnership announced in September will allow Australia to build at least eight nuclear-powered submarines using US technology. Russian President Vladimir Putin accused AUKUS of undermining regional stability and hoped the nuclear submarine cooperation will not develop in an unprecedented way and create additional problems in the region. Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian said on October 14 that the AUKUS nuclear submarine cooperation has created serious nuclear proliferation risks, and clearly violated the spirit of the Treaty on Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. 

He noted that it would not only have a far-reaching impact on the international non-proliferation system, but also bring real threats to regional peace and stability. ……..   https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202111/1238296.shtml

November 8, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics international | Leave a comment

Lies, lies and nuclear submarines


Lies, lies and nuclear submarines, Green Left, 
Binoy Kampmark, November 6, 2021

The sundering of the relationship between Australia and France over the new trilateral security relationship between Canberra, Washington and London and, more importantly, the rescinding of the submarine contract with Australia, was playing on President Emmanuel Macron’s mind at the G20 Summit in Rome.Did he think he had been lied to by the Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison about the intended scrapping of the Franco-Australian submarine deal with the creation of AUKUS? “I don’t think, I know,” came the definitive answer.


The response from Morrison was one of shameless dissembling. Making sure that Australian audiences and news waves would only pick up select gobbets, he told the media that the French president had attacked Australia. He said he was concerned about “the statements that were made questioning Australia’s integrity and the slurs that have been placed on Australia”. Further, he said, he was “not going to cop sledging at Australia”. A full reading of Macron’s words in the brief encounter suggests that didn’t happen. He respected “sovereign choices” but said it was vital to “respect allies and partners.” It was the conduct of Australia’s government Macron had issues with………………….

Morrison’s mendacity is also pronounced in how he justified pursuing the nuclear submarine option with the United States…………

The Morrison government also used the well worn practice of selective leaking to bolster its quicksand position.

prodding text from Macron to Morrison, sent two days prior to the AUKUS announcement and the cancellation of the contract, involved a query as to whether good or bad news could be expected about the French submarines.

The insinuation is that Macron had an inkling that something was afoot from the Australian side — hardly counting as being informed. Morrison’s response is not noted. The Elysée has also denied suggestions that Canberra made several warning efforts regarding the AUKUS announcement.

An Elysée official said: “Disclosing a text message exchange between heads of state or government is a pretty crude and unconventional tactic”. It may be crude, but it is an apt summation of the Prime Minister’s view of diplomacy.  https://www.greenleft.org.au/content/lies-lies-and-nuclear-submarines

November 8, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics international | Leave a comment

AECOM deeply involved in nuclear submarines


Greg Phillips
    Nuclear Fuel Cycle Watch 
·
 7 Nov 21, I knew AECOM was involved in nuclear, but I didn’t know they were involved in nuclear submarines -“Since 1992, AECOM has served as the Navy’s primary provider of professional support services to the VIRGINIA class submarine program office, including integration and test support at the shipyards where the vessels are built. …””AECOM has supported the Navy’s nuclear submarine force for more than 43 years. We also support LOS ANGELES, SEAWOLF and OHIO class submarines, in addition to VIRGINIA. …” https://aecom.com/future/projects/virginia-class-submarine/?fbclid=IwAR3FZXfLFyH0FjRH0uRJrybdYwVdljvnJ6QhsEexXq3Ve3GkIUl0_rTxyVc

 https://www.facebook.com/groups/1021186047913052

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Scott Morrison is hiding behind future technologies, when we should just deploy what already exists — RenewEconomy

Australia doesn’t need to wait for new technology before committing to deep emissions cuts. Most technologies we need already exist – they just need to be deployed at massive scale. The post Scott Morrison is hiding behind future technologies, when we should just deploy what already exists appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Scott Morrison is hiding behind future technologies, when we should just deploy what already exists — RenewEconomy

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

NSW, ACT and South Australia in cross party push to speed transition to net zero — RenewEconomy

NSW, South Australia and ACT form cross-party state alliance to fast track shift to zero emissions with focus on existing technologies. The post NSW, ACT and South Australia in cross party push to speed transition to net zero appeared first on RenewEconomy.

NSW, ACT and South Australia in cross party push to speed transition to net zero — RenewEconomy

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The highs and lows of Australia’s increasingly variable energy market — RenewEconomy

Australia’s electricity market will be dominated by more rooftop solar, growing amounts of large scale wind and solar, and storage. The post The highs and lows of Australia’s increasingly variable energy market appeared first on RenewEconomy.

The highs and lows of Australia’s increasingly variable energy market — RenewEconomy

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Telstra lands energy retail licence, to challenge incumbents with green energy offer — RenewEconomy

Telstra to launch challenge to big energy incumbents after regulator granted a licence to offer energy services to its 13 million phone and internet customers. The post Telstra lands energy retail licence, to challenge incumbents with green energy offer appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Telstra lands energy retail licence, to challenge incumbents with green energy offer — RenewEconomy

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Precious waters — Tribes file to stop pollution from uranium and other hard rock mines

“The Havasupai Tribe has fought for decades to protect our beautiful water and traditional cultural lands from the harmful effects of uranium mining,”

Tribes file to stop pollution from uranium and other hard rock mines

Precious waters — Beyond Nuclear International Tribes, Indigenous groups, conservation organizations file petition to strengthen federal mining rules, By Earthworks, 7 Nov 21, Tribes, Indigenous groups and conservation organizations filed a rulemaking petition on September 16 with the U.S. Department of the Interior to improve and modernize hardrock mining oversight on public lands. The proposed revisions aim to safeguard critically important lands across the West and Alaska, including sacred lands and their cultural resources, vital wildlife habitat, and invaluable water resources.

“It’s long past time to reform the nation’s hardrock mining rules, end generations of mining-inflicted injustice to Indigenous communities, and chart a new course for public lands stewardship toward a sustainable, clean energy economy,” the petition states. “For far too long, mining companies have had free rein to decimate lands of cultural importance to tribes and public lands at enormous cost to people, wildlife, and these beautiful wild places of historic and cultural significance. The harm is undeniable, severe, and irreparable. Reforming these rules will prevent more damage, help us transition to green infrastructure, and leave a livable planet to future generations.”

The petition seeks to significantly update hardrock mining regulations, a need the Biden administration has also identified, to avoid perpetuating the mining industry’s toxic legacy. Current regulations disproportionately burden Indigenous and other disenfranchised communities with pollution and threaten land, water, wildlife and climate. New mining rules would help protect these resources and minimize the damage from the mineral demands of transitioning to a cleaner energy economy……………

“It is unacceptable for mining companies to evade scrutiny and tribal consultation requirements using outdated regulatory loopholes,” said Tohono O’odham Nation Chairman Ned Norris, Jr. “At this very moment, mining projects in Arizona are threatening the permanent destruction of dozens of sacred sites for the Tohono O’odham Nation and other tribes. That is why the Tohono O’odham Legislative Council has unanimously taken a position in support of righting this historic wrong. The time has come for the federal government to uphold its responsibility in ensuring that sacred lands and waters are properly protected.”

“The Havasupai Tribe has fought for decades to protect our beautiful water and traditional cultural lands from the harmful effects of uranium mining,” said Vice Chairman Matthew Putesoy, Sr. of the Havasupai Tribe. “Each day uranium mining threatens contamination of Havasu Creek, which is the sole water source that provides life to Supai Village, our tribal homeland located at the bottom of the Grand Canyon.  Without this precious resource, our Tribe and our homeland will be destroyed. We know that uranium poses a serious and irreversible threat to our survival as a people. This petition is necessary to hold the Department of Interior accountable for meeting its federal trust responsibility and helping to protect our sacred traditional cultural homelands and waters from the harmful and often irreversible effects of mining.”……………….

“We face an existential climate crisis, and must move quickly to convert our infrastructure to support low-carbon energy — but we must do so without replacing dirty oil with dirty mining,” said Lauren Pagel of Earthworks. “The Biden administration has an historic opportunity to confront the legacy of injustice to Indigenous communities and damage to the public lands and waters held in trust for all Americans. Seizing that opportunity requires policies that prioritize metals recycling and reuse over new mining. Where new mining is acceptable, the mining industry must undertake the most responsible methods.”

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the metals mining industry is the single largest source of toxic waste in the United States, and hardrock mines have contaminated an estimated 40% of Western watersheds. Unlike the oil, gas, and coal industries, metal mining companies pay nothing to extract publicly owned minerals from public lands across the West and Alaska.

The Interior Department oversees the regulations governing compliance with federal mining law and other public lands laws. The petition proposes revisions to several mining regulations and includes legal and policy analysis for each proposed improvement.

Overhauling the rules is a critical step toward bringing mining regulations and policy into the 21st century to protect public health and Indigenous and public lands and resources in the West.

Proposed revisions include:
 – Clarifying that the BLM must use its authority to protect tribal and cultural resources and values, wildlife, and water quality and quantity; 
 – Requiring the BLM to verify mining rights;
 – Closing loopholes that allow the mining industry to escape public review and consultation with local tribes and governments

The Interior Department is required to respond to the petition within a reasonable amount of time and indicate whether it will revise the rules. https://beyondnuclearinternational.org/2021/11/07/precious-waters/

November 8, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment