Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) asks people to comment on public health and radioactive waste dump

Advisory Note: Public health considerations for siting, construction and operation of a radioactive waste disposal facility,  Start/End Date: Monday 15 November 2021 – 09:00 to Wednesday 15 December 2021 

ARPANSA invites people and organisations interested in this advisory note to tell us their views on this topic. Go to their website to comment  https://www.arpansa.gov.au/advisory-note-public-health-considerations-siting-construction-and-operation-radioactive-waste?fbclid=IwAR0Z3RlSlkA8VJg-vLDDJUFnegLe8sYk5v_lIcGIFfGUv6Y9c3WabJldJCc

What is the purpose of this Advisory Note?

This advisory note provides an explanation of health and well-being as referred to in RPS C-3: Code for Disposal Facilities for Solid Radioactive Waste (ARPANSA 2018). It is intended to provide guidance on ARPANSA’s expectations for consideration of community well-being throughout the siting, construction and operation of a radioactive waste disposal facility.

disposal facility,  Start/End Date: Monday 15 November 2021 – 09:00 to Wednesday 15 December 2021 ARPANSA invites people and organisations interested in this advisory note to tell us their views on this topic.

What is the purpose of this Advisory Note?

This advisory note provides an explanation of health and well-being as referred to in RPS C-3: Code for Disposal Facilities for Solid Radioactive Waste (ARPANSA 2018). It is intended to provide guidance on ARPANSA’s expectations for consideration of community well-being throughout the siting, construction and operation of a radioactive waste disposal facility.

Once finalised, this advisory note will be published on ARPANSA’s website as supporting guidance to RPS C-3.

What is radioactive waste?

Radioactive waste is material with an activity content or concentration above a predefined level, for which no further use is foreseen. Disposal is the recognised end point for the management of radioactive waste under a hierarchy of waste controls; however, storage of some wastes for periods of tens of years is often a necessary precursor.

What is the exposure risk to the public and the environment?

Radioactive waste management includes the potential for people to be exposed to radiation during the operation and closure stages of a waste facility.  Therefore the operator must demonstrate that protection of people and the environment has been considered and that there will be minimal risk of any radiation exposure. In this regard, the operations and closure of waste facilities are regulated in the same way as any other radiation practice.

How is health defined in the Code for Disposal Facilities for Solid Radioactive Waste?

The Code references the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of health, where health is defined as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. The state of health and well-being of an impacted community throughout all stages of a proposed Disposal Facility informs the process of optimisation and decision making. 

disposal facility,  Start/End Date: Monday 15 November 2021 – 09:00 to Wednesday 15 December 2021 ARPANSA invites people and organisations interested in this advisory note to tell us their views on this topic.

What is the purpose of this Advisory Note?

This advisory note provides an explanation of health and well-being as referred to in RPS C-3: Code for Disposal Facilities for Solid Radioactive Waste (ARPANSA 2018). It is intended to provide guidance on ARPANSA’s expectations for consideration of community well-being throughout the siting, construction and operation of a radioactive waste disposal facility.

Once finalised, this advisory note will be published on ARPANSA’s website as supporting guidance to RPS C-3.

What is radioactive waste?

Radioactive waste is material with an activity content or concentration above a predefined level, for which no further use is foreseen. Disposal is the recognised end point for the management of radioactive waste under a hierarchy of waste controls; however, storage of some wastes for periods of tens of years is often a necessary precursor.

What is the exposure risk to the public and the environment?

Radioactive waste management includes the potential for people to be exposed to radiation during the operation and closure stages of a waste facility.  Therefore the operator must demonstrate that protection of people and the environment has been considered and that there will be minimal risk of any radiation exposure. In this regard, the operations and closure of waste facilities are regulated in the same way as any other radiation practice.

How is health defined in the Code for Disposal Facilities for Solid Radioactive Waste?

The Code references the World Health Organization (WHO) definition of health, where health is defined as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. The state of health and well-being of an impacted community throughout all stages of a proposed Disposal Facility informs the process of optimisation and decision making. 

How can consideration of community health and wellbeing be demonstrated? 

In demonstrating radiation protection of the public, the proponent also needs to demonstrate the health and well-being of the impacted community related to all stages of the proposed Disposal Facility and directly related to radiation exposure. 
An ethical and inclusive approach to engagement with the community allows all concerned parties are given the opportunity to participate in discussions and deliberations and ensures that decision-making takes into account their knowledge as well as their concerns over how the facility may affect them.

A description and discussion of health and well-being considerations should be included in the safety case for the facility. This should include the ongoing and interactive process of optimisation of radiation protection and the consideration of societal factors…..

Making a comment………

ARPANSA invites people and organisations interested in this advisory note to tell us their views on this topic.

November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

China calls on the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to make Southeast Asia a nuclear-weapons-free zone


China pushes for nuclear-weapon-free Southeast Asia, KhmerTimes, Aandolu Agency  ISTANBUL 22 Nov 1 
– China on Monday said it is ready to work with the members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) towards a nuclear-weapon-free region besides ensuring stability in the disputed South China Sea.

“China supports ASEAN’s efforts to build a nuclear-weapon-free zone, and is prepared to sign the Protocol to the Treaty on the Southeast Asia Nuclear-Weapon-Free Zone as early as possible,” President Xi Jinping told the China-Asia summit marking 30 years of the relations between two sides.

Beijing’s demand for a nuclear-free Southeast Asia comes as the US and UK empower their ally Australia with nuclear-armed submarines under a deal called AUKUS signed in September………..

The bilateral trade between China and ASEAN has skyrocketed by 85 times to $684.6 billion in 2020 from less than $8 billion in 1991, making the two sides each other’s largest trading partners. https://www.khmertimeskh.com/50975461/china-pushes-for-nuclear-weapon-free-southeast-asia/

November 23, 2021 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics international, weapons and war | Leave a comment

The US Faces Pressure To Do More To Address Its Nuclear Legacy In The Marshall Islands.

The US Faces Pressure To Do More To Address Its Nuclear Legacy In The Marshall Islands,  Civil Beat     By Anita Hofschneider   22 Nov 21,   Marshallese are concerned about continued health effects from Cold War-era nuclear testing as well as a concrete dome in which the atomic waste was stored.

Two Congress members are asking the U.S. Department of Energy to provide more information about the effects of U.S. nuclear waste in the Marshall Islands.

The U.S. conducted 67 nuclear weapons tests in the Marshall Islands from 1946 to 1958, exposing Marshallese people to radiation that continues to have health and environmental implications. The U.S. then stored the atomic waste at Runit Dome, a concrete dome on Enewetak Atoll.

Rep. Katie Porter represents Orange County, California, and is chair of the Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations in the House Committee on Natural Resources.

She has been seeking more details about the effects of nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands in the wake of a Los Angeles Times investigation that found the U.S. stored nuclear waste from Nevada in Runit Dome without informing the Pacific nation.

In a letter Friday, Porter and Rep. Raul Grijalva of Arizona asked for documents and correspondence among Department of Energy officials related to a letter that officials sent to the Marshall Islands about the state of nuclear waste in May.

The Department of Energy didn’t respond to a request for comment.

In October, Porter led a congressional hearing regarding concerns about Runit Dome, which is leaking radioactive waste. The Energy Department said in a report last year that the leaking is not significant.

“The U.S. has both a moral and national security imperative to address our nuclear legacy in the Marshall Islands,” Porter said at the hearing, adding that addressing the issue would be in line with the Biden administration’s commitment to racial justice and national security issues in the Pacific………

In their letter, Porter and Grijalva criticized the agency’s lack of response to repeated document requests, raised concerns about conflicting Energy Department testimony and the timing of the department’s May letter.

The U.S. is in the midst of renegotiating a treaty with the Marshall Islands that in part gives the U.S. military strategic denial rights over the country’s surrounding air and waters.

The Congress members described how the U.S. failed to evacuate Marshallese people quickly enough to protect them from the fallout during the 1946-1958 testing, and cited descriptions of how mothers later gave birth to babies with translucent skin and no bones.

A 2014 study analyzed how the radiation exposure in the Marshall Islands increased the risk of certain cancers, especially thyroid cancer.

Broader Concerns

Franscine Anmontha, communication director of the Marshall Islands National Nuclear Commission, said Saturday that the community is concerned about the ongoing health effects of radiation on people not only on the atolls enrolled in the U.S. medical program but on surrounding atolls.

“If you were to ask a group of young Marshallese people if they knew someone with cancer almost 90% of them would raise their hands,” she said. She said the commission wants to bring scientists to the Marshall Islands to analyze the dome so that they don’t have to rely solely on U.S. data……….

Friday’s letter is the second letter this month pressing the Biden administration for more information about the nuclear testing.

Several Congress members — including Hawaii Reps. Ed Case and Kai Kahele — wrote to the White House on Nov. 5 pushing for the appointment of a lead negotiator for treaty discussions who would have the ability to address concerns about nuclear waste.

The lead negotiator “should have the mandate to see that legacy issues related to U.S. nuclear testing in the region are appropriately resolved, including proper environmental protections, clean up, health benefits, and monetary compensation for victims and their descendants,” the lawmakers wrote………….  https://www.civilbeat.org/2021/11/the-us-faces-pressure-to-do-more-to-address-its-nuclear-legacy-in-the-marshall-islands/

November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Europe to pay half for raising Russia’s dangerous sunken submarines, – while Russia builds new ones!

The sunken submarines K-27 and K-159 are the potential source of contamination of the Arctic, the riskiest ones,”

As Moscow this spring took the Chair of the Arctic Council, the need to lift dangerous nuclear materials from the seabed was highlighted as a priority.

No other places in the world’s oceans have more radioactive and nuclear waste than the Kara Sea.

Europe to pay half … it is a dilemma that international partners are providing financial support to lift old Cold War submarines from the ocean, while Russia gives priority to building new nuclear-powered submarines threatening the security landscape in northern Europe. 

EU willing to co-fund lifting of sunken nuclear subs from Arctic seabed  https://thebarentsobserver.com/en/nuclear-safety/2021/11/europe-offers-pay-russia-raise-sunken-nuclear-subs The Northern Dimension Environmental Partnership (NDEP) has decided to start a technical review aimed to find a safe way to lift two Cold War submarines from the Barents- and Kara Seas. By Thomas Nilsen   

“We are proceeding now,” says a smiling Jari Vilén, Finland’s Ambassador for Barents and Northern Dimension.

Projects aimed to improve nuclear safety are some of the few successful arenas for cooperation still going strong between the European Union and Russia.

“In roughly two years time we will have the understanding on what and how it can be done, what kind of technology has to be used,” Vilén elaborates with reference to the two old Soviet submarines K-159 and K-27, both rusting on the Arctic seabed with highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel elements in their reactors.

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November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Three offshore wind projects get $40m boost from Victorian government — RenewEconomy

Victorian government allocates $40 million to kick start three major offshore wind projects by the Star of the South, Macquarie Group and Flotation Energy. The post Three offshore wind projects get $40m boost from Victorian government appeared first on RenewEconomy.

Three offshore wind projects get $40m boost from Victorian government — RenewEconomy

November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

New ARENA funding round to help plug one of last gaps to 100 pct renewables grid — RenewEconomy

A new $100 million funding round will support the rollout of grid forming battery inverters that could fill one of the last technical gaps to 100 pct renewables. The post New ARENA funding round to help plug one of last gaps to 100 pct renewables grid appeared first on RenewEconomy.

New ARENA funding round to help plug one of last gaps to 100 pct renewables grid — RenewEconomy

November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

November 22 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion:  ¶ “Why Schools Are Failing Children On Climate Change” • Ever since Greta Thunberg started her campaign on climate change, children have been taking center stage in the fight against a rapidly warming world. And as they do, many are pushing for schools to add climate change to their curriculum. In some places, that […]

November 22 Energy News — geoharvey

November 23, 2021 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment