Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives standing for South Australian election, with pro nuclear policy

Among policy positions to be revealed in greater detail in coming weeks are the scrapping of the Safe Schools program, capping the premier’s tenure to two terms, and developing a nuclear fuel cycle industry.

Senator Bernardi said the ­direction of preferences would be “subject to negotiation between the major parties”.

Cory Bernardi’s Australian Conservatives to fight for 20 seats in SA election, http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/state-politics/cory-bernardis-australian-conservatives-to-fight-for-20-seats-in-sa-election/news-story/7130de833df916429b388f70b26ff443, MICHAEL OWEN, SA Bureau Chief, Adelaide@mjowen, – 19 Jan 18

Cory Bernardi’s conservative party will run at least 20 candidates in lower house seats at the South Australian election, mirroring the plans of Nick Xenophon’s SA Best and heightening the critical role of preferences in determining the outcome of the March 17 poll.

The move comes after the Australian Conservatives ran candidate Joram Richa in the federal seat of Bennelong, in Sydney’s north, in a key by-election last month, polling 4.5 per cent of the vote and directing preferences to Liberal John Alexander, who retained the seat.

While Mr Xenophon has vowed to run candidates in an equal number of Labor and Liberal-held seats in the South Australian election, Senator Bernardi yesterday said “we have not taken that into consideration at all”.

“We are just looking at where we’ve had candidates apply and want to run, consistent with our values and principles, and where we think we can actually shape some outcomes,” Senator Bernardi said.

“We are contesting the election to give people a genuinely conservative and principled ­option. Ultimately, our goal is to continue to have strong Australian Conservatives representation in the upper house, where we can actually shape legislative outcomes.”

The South Australian senator quit the Liberal Party last February and in April amalgamated with Family First, gaining two representatives in South Australia’s upper house, Robert Brokenshire and Dennis Hood.

Mr Brokenshire is up for re-election and will lead the party’s upper house ticket with running mate Nicolle Jachmann, a Riverland businesswoman. Experts are predicting up to six of the 11 upper house seats on offer could be won by minor party candidates.

Key figures from the Australian Conservatives yesterday met in Adelaide to settle on the party’s election plans.

“We’ve had expressions of ­interest from many candidates and at this stage it looks like we’ll have around 20 contesting lower house seats,” Senator Bernardi told The Weekend Australian.

This could increase to as many as 25 when selections are finalised next week.

Among the 20 seats in the 47-seat House of Assembly to be ­targeted by the Australian Conservatives is the Liberal-held marginal seat of Hartley, which Mr Xenophon quit the Senate to contest.

The conservative party also will run in the Riverland seat of Chaffey; Narungga (formerly Goyder) on the Yorke Peninsula; Finnis in the Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island; and in the inner-southern Adelaide seat of Waite.

Senator Bernardi said candidate selection was being finalised and there were some “very well-credentialed people”, understood to include a former judicial officer. Unlike Mr Xenophon’s SA Best, Senator Bernardi said his party would not be charging candidates an upfront, non-refundable fee of $20,000 to run.

Among policy positions to be revealed in greater detail in coming weeks are the scrapping of the Safe Schools program, capping the premier’s tenure to two terms, and developing a nuclear fuel cycle industry.

Senator Bernardi said the ­direction of preferences would be “subject to negotiation between the major parties”.

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January 20, 2018 - Posted by | politics, South Australia

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