Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

The Custody Notification System saves Aboriginal lives. Why isn’t it national?

Gerry Georgatos   @GerryGeorgatosle’ 14 Mar 2018

‘We know that notifying an Aboriginal legal service
when an Aboriginal person is arrested saves lives and costs little.
The lack of nationwide action is unacceptable

‘The CNS has been championed by the federal Minister for Indigenous Affairs, Senator Nigel Scullion.
We have had a number of conversations about the CNS and he gets it,
he understands the need for it to be rolled out nationally.

‘He saved the CNS in NSW and the ACT by funding it to mid-2019,
pulling together the $1.8m out of his portfolio,
even though it was the responsibility of other portfolio holders.

‘The CNS has also been championed by WA’s Senator Sue Lines
who knows how desperately her home state needs it.

‘The Western Australian state Labor party has committed to implementing the CNS when elected.
It is time every state and territory does the right thing and implements the CNS.
There is no greater legacy than to save lives.

‘I will wrap up with the words of members of Ms Dhu’s familyUncle Shaun Harris said,
“We do not want this to happen to anyone else.
Our families are heartbroken and the pain has not left us.”
Ms Dhu’s mother, Della Roe, said,
“My daughter should be with us today.
Her loss haunts me each day and it will remain but it will give me
at least an ounce of peace to see the CNS implemented.”’
www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/15/the-custody-notification-system-saves-aboriginal-lives-why-isnt-it-national

May 24, 2018 Posted by | aboriginal issues, AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL | Leave a comment

How our thinking has been affected by nuclear secrecy and lies

From the Windscale fire in the U.K. to the Chernobyl disaster, from Rocky Flats to Three Mile Island in the U.S., and from Mayak in the USSR to Fukushima, that compulsive secrecy, deviousness, and lack of accountability have persisted, even as the technology has morphed from military to civilian uses. Nuclear subterfuge has eroded public trust, debate, and decision making alike.

How the ‘Compulsive Secrecy’ of the Atomic Age Has Changed the Way We Think, TIME,   By FRED PEARCE May 22, 2018

One sunny morning in September 1957, a line of military trucks drove down a narrow lane beside a lake in the foothills of the Ural Mountains, the chain that divides European Russia from Siberia. They stopped at a tiny village called Satlykovo. Red Army troops began knocking on doors and ordering the few hundred inhabitants to strip off their clothes, put on replacements unloaded from the trucks, and climb aboard. The villagers were being evacuated. They could not take any of their possessions, not even banknotes. As the evacuees bid a hasty goodbye to their worldly goods, the soldiers knocked down their homes to prevent them returning, and shot their cattle and pets.

The troops gave no explanation for the evacuation. They could not say — even if they knew — that a week before there had been an explosion in radioactive waste tanks at Russia’s biggest plutonium factory, in the nearby closed city known today as Ozersk. Nor could they say that the strange dark cloud that had descended on Satlykovo hours later contained the deadly fallout from the accident. Most likely it had been responsible for the death of Iran Khaerzamanov’s 10-month-old daughter, who had been in the garden with her grandmother when the cloud descended. She suffered severe diarrhea and died hours later. Her body was the last to be buried at the village cemetery.

The troops could not say any of this because the very existence of the nuclear-weapons complex was a military secret, known only to its fenced-in workers. Nobody outside was supposed to know — ever.

Sixty years later, on another bright, sunny morning, I became the first Western journalist to visit Satlykovo since the accident. I drove through a gate still guarded by armed troops and down a long rutted lane. I found the village, but the remains of the 75 hastily demolished houses were consumed by vegetation. Nettles were everywhere. The hot, sticky air was thick with giant dragonflies. Across overgrown fields, the lake had plenty of fish, though nobody was allowed to catch them. The encroaching forest along the track harbored elk, wild boar and foxes. Radioactive it may have been, but a barren wasteland it was not.

So started my journey to discovery the radioactive legacies of the nuclear age, an age I believe and hope is coming to a close. On this journey I explored the weird radioactive badlands created by nuclear accidents — some famous, such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, and some largely unknown, like the area around Satlykovo. I visited places where atomic bombs have been dropped, in the name of science or as acts of war, and where radioactive wolves roam but people fear to tread. I tried also to make sense of our many personal and collective responses to the unleashing of the power of the atom, to the sense of foreboding and the all-too-real threat that it could be used to annihilate us all. In many ways this new psychological landscape turns out to be the strangest place of all. Continue reading

May 24, 2018 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

In our joy about space travel – let’s not forget that it damages the brain

Can we protect the brain from cosmic radiation? Medical News Today , As we prepare to enter a new era of space travel, we must find ways of averting health risks posed by the cosmic environment. Deep space radiation, in particular, is known to impair cognitive function………. One main threat comes from cosmic radiation, which can harm the central nervous system, altering cognitive function and leading to symptoms similar to those found in Alzheimer’s disease.

……. ‘Cosmic radiation may affect brain long-term’Previous research conducted by Rosi and team found that, after mice were exposed to a level of radiation roughly equivalent to what human astronauts might encounter during an outer space mission, their capacity to differentiate between familiar and unfamiliar objects was impaired.

Usually, when mice are faced with two objects — one that is new and unknown to them and one that they formerly explored — they will spend more time familiarizing themselves with the new object.

However, the animals that had been exposed to radiation tended to spend an equal amount of time exploring both objects, which suggested to the researchers that the mice had forgotten they had already been exposed to one of the two.

Other symptoms that the mice presented included problems with social interactions and a sense of elevated anxiety. Rosi and team note that this was likely because of the effect the strong radiation had on the microglia, or nerve cells found in the brain and spinal chord that are part of the central nervous system’s immune mechanism.

When microglia are activated, they can cause symptoms — such as impaired memory recall — that are consistent with those of neurodegenerative disorders.

This is partly due to the fact that they are driven to destroy synapses, or the connections formed between brain cells that allow them to convey information.

We are starting to have evidence that exposure to deep space radiation might affect brain function over the long-term, but as far as I know, no one had explored any possible countermeasures that might protect astronauts’ brains against this level of radiation exposure.”     Susanna Rosi………https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/321898.php

May 24, 2018 Posted by | General News | 1 Comment

UPC lands investor to advance huge wind, solar projects — RenewEconomy

UPC to advance biggest solar development in NSW and country’s biggest wind farm in Tasmania after bringing in a major new investor.

via UPC lands investor to advance huge wind, solar projects — RenewEconomy

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Canadian Mining Company Tries To Force Uranium Mining On Virginia; Trump Admin Gives Support To Uranium Mining Co.: Case To Be Heard By US Supreme Court — Mining Awareness +

On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to decide if US states have the right to protect themselves against uranium mining. [1] The CEO of Virginia Uranium, subsidiary to Canadian Registered Virginia Energy Resources, Walter Coles, was a USAID privatization chief for Russia in the early 1990s. In that capacity he worked with/supported the St. […]

via Canadian Mining Company Tries To Force Uranium Mining On Virginia; Trump Admin Gives Support To Uranium Mining Co.: Case To Be Heard By US Supreme Court — Mining Awareness +

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Can the rooftop solar boom keep going? — RenewEconomy

One-third through 2018 and we’ve chalked up 100MW+ new rooftop solar every single month. But how long can the solar boom last?

via Can the rooftop solar boom keep going? — RenewEconomy

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Tasmania’s biggest solar farm wins council approval — RenewEconomy

Tasmania is going solar, with Epuron about to build the first two solar farms – 5MW and 12.5MW – in the island state.

via Tasmania’s biggest solar farm wins council approval — RenewEconomy

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Carnegie raises $5.3 million for solar, battery, wave — RenewEconomy

Carnegie Clean Energy raises $5.3m to go towards existing and pipeline of wave, solar and battery storage microgrid projects.

via Carnegie raises $5.3 million for solar, battery, wave — RenewEconomy

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Japan’s government weighs dumping radioactive Fukushima water into the Pacific — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

As the cleanup of a triple meltdown following an earthquake and tsunami at the Fukushima nuclear power plant drags into its seventh year, one of the biggest continuing threats is less from airborne radioactivity than it is simple water. A waterlogged radiation and tsunami warning sign found on Fukushima beaches in 2013. May 22, […]

via Japan’s government weighs dumping radioactive Fukushima water into the Pacific — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

‘Everything is fine and delicious in Fukushima’ according to the director the Fukushima Reconstruction Promotion Group at the minister’s secretariat of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

Fukushima, seven years on by Hideyasu Tamura May 21, 2018 More than seven years have passed since the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent accident at Tokyo Electric Power Co.’s Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in 2011. A successful decommissioning of the plant and reconstruction of Fukushima is one of the most important missions […]

via ‘Everything is fine and delicious in Fukushima’ according to the director the Fukushima Reconstruction Promotion Group at the minister’s secretariat of the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Japan still at a loss in how to deal with Fukushima’s radioactive water — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

20 May, 2018 The number of storage tanks for contaminated water and other materials has continuously increased at the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant in Japan, and space for still more tanks is approaching the limit. It is seven years since an eathquake and tsunami overwhelmed Fukushima and a way to get rid of […]

via Japan still at a loss in how to deal with Fukushima’s radioactive water — Fukushima 311 Watchdogs

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment

May 24 Energy News — geoharvey

Opinion: ¶ “The Pros & Cons Of Biofuels” • Even if governments wanted to change every car to an electric car, every medieval style of energy inefficient house to be exemplary in high-tech modernity and carbon neutrality, and every electricity generator to operate without burning fossil fuels, the goal could not be achieved in an […]

via May 24 Energy News — geoharvey

May 24, 2018 Posted by | Uncategorized | Leave a comment