Antinuclear

Australian news, and some related international items

Global Treaty to Ban Nuclear Weapons

The 10-page treaty on the prohibition of nuclear weapons will be open for signatures from any UN member state on 20 September during the annual general assembly.

On 7 July, the United Nations adopted the “Nuclear Weapons Treaty” with an overwhelming majority – an epoch-making agreement that prohibits not only the development, experiment, manufacture, possession, and use of nuclear weapons, but also the “threat to use”. Nuclear and chemical weapons, and anti-personnel landmines and cluster bombs were also banned.

The U.N. decided to start negotiations for the treaty after a series of three conferences on the humanitarian consequences of nuclear weapons. It’s been a long and painstaking journey, for people of decency and good faith, from the first conference in Oslo, Norway in March 2013, to the most recent, in July 2017 when the global Treaty was adopted by 122 nations. Now, this month, nations can ratify this Treaty – a positive step in the movement towards a sane world. It is not too late for more countries to join.

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September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

To September 9th – the week in nuclear and climate news

People are experiencing “nuclear brink fatigue”. It’s only human, as right now, most of the world is unable to do anything about the impending showdown between USA and North Korea. It’s all too possible that both the North Korean and American regimes are now pondering just how many lives can be blown up while still assuring the leaders of staying in power. Brown and yellow lives are the risked ones, as North Korea can’t or wouldn’t attack USA. Meanwhile Donald Trump has assured that “If thousands die, they’re going to die over there. They’re not going to die over here — and he’s told me that to my face.” –  Senator Lindsey Graham

Climate and nuclear concerns merge in Florida. With our news media focusing on Hurricane Irma, you’d hardly know that 40 million people are impacted by floods in India, Bangladesh and Nepal.  International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) is being urged to get strong participation of women in climate change discussions and decisions.

AUSTRALIA

Australia’s choice: back nuclear war, or support UN nuclear weapons ban.  Donald Trump and Malcolm Turnbull hold talks, as North Korea again threatens America.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHcRpT4zLT0 Foreign Minister Julie Bishop in pro uranium session with CEO of failed miner Paladin!

Australia’s defence forces to buy lethal drones from US nuclear weapons maker General Atomics?

John Quiggan demolishes foolish Minerals Council of Australia’s pro nuclear spin.– Mining lobby out to silence environmental charities.

Australia’s (?stupid) National Party wants: nuclear power, guns, and stop renewable energy.

CLIMATE and ENERGY Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions have risen. CSIRO a paid-up member of Minerals Council, which fights climate change action. Turnbull government encouraging mining, funds exploration. Greens warn Labor not to do clean energy deal that protects coal power.

Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) supports incentives for households to cut power this summer. Australian Energy Market Operator focuses on dispatchable and flexible energy generationSouth Australia’s Tesla big battery can stop the price gouging by Australia’s major energy players. Victoria takes the lead on Renewable Energy Targets. Lotsa renewable energy news at http://reneweconomy.com.au/

NUCLEAR Concerned South Australians are vigourously responding on Facebook,  to the Federal Nuclear Waste Dump plan. Fragile ecosystem of the Flinders Ranges – threatened by nuclear waste dumping.

September 9, 2017 Posted by | Christina reviews | Leave a comment

South Australian responses to Federal Nuclear Waste Dump plan – Facebook

  Paul Waldon  Fight To Stop Nuclear Waste Dump In Flinders Ranges SA  https://www.facebook.com/groups/344452605899556/
8 Sept 17, ANSTO and DIIS are hedging ones bets on a chosen site while their agenda has always been to abandon High Grade waste under the guise of calling it Intermediate Waste.

Regina McKenzie I say No to nuclear waste dump in the Flinders Ranges or anywhere , the government says if there is a strong community movement against it , they will walk away . So why are they still hanging around Barndioota, Like blow flies on a shitty arse sheep? Honest they say one thing and do another , just a form of bullying from the Federal government, SA dont want No Nuclear Waste dump! Get over it and move on ….. We Say No!

Paul WaldonHow does your community make a small fortune gambling on nuclear waste? You start with a big fortune! The monkeys in the community happy to accept peanuts to risk contamination and death of their environment, maybe satisfied till things go wrong. But remember the culturally significant, seismically unstable, flood prone, non reducing, aquifer vulnerable, tourism missed, and peoples welfare are all issues that ANSTO, ARPANZA, and the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science have all overlooked or have NO regard for, in their wrongful pursuit to ensure their own job security.

 Steve Dale They do it because they are drowning in a sea of nuclear muck of their own creation, and they want to keep creating nuclear muck for profit. They are drowning and they are desperate – and if we are not careful they will drag down everything good about South Australia with them.

Mark Gill A big question to be answered is WHY??….
Why HAS AN INTERMEDIATE DUMP BEEN CONSIDERED ALONGSIDE THIS IDEA..??….
NOW..
IF A CONTAINMENT FIELD THAT IS MADE `SAFE` CANNOT BE SITUATED NEAR LUCAS HEIGHTS.??..
.
WHY DOES IT NEED TO BE `OUTBACK` IF ITS SOOO SAFE..??..
WE DONT TRUST U MOB TO LEAVE IT LOW..
CMON.. U THINK WE ARE STUPID..!!..
ONCE YOU HAVE LOW-THEN U GO MEDIUM… THEN U GO HIGH AND STUFF FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD(SPENT RODS ect)
Gets sent here for REHAB.. 200,000YRS .

NOOO.. THAT MEANS NNNOOO…

Paul Waldon  September 7 regional news, reports Broken Hill in the grip of a tourism boom, and things are looking rosy. While ANSTO and the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science are busy promoting South Australia as a “Nuclear Dump.” There is no Cupie Doll, as a prize for the person who can guess who prospers and what state goes down the toilet.

September 9, 2017 Posted by | Federal nuclear waste dump, South Australia | Leave a comment

Sweden considers nuclear waste, (far more carefully than Finland ever did)

This is of particular interest to Australia. Our government touts Finland as the great model for acceptance of nuclear waste dump. But in fact, the model adopted by Finland, (by a poorly informed public) was taken from the one refused by Sweden – where a much more informed community used a much more democratic process to study the waste dump issue. See “When haste makes risky waste: Public involvement in radioactive and nuclear waste management in Sweden and Finland” http://bellona.org/…/radioactive-waste…/2016-08-21710

The Environmental Court’s main licensing hearing about a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark – September 5 to October 27     http://www.mkg.se/en/the-environmental-court-s-main-licensing-hearing-about-a-final-repository-for-spent-nuclear-fuel-in#.WbJtaWAl7II.facebook The Environmental Court’s main hearing concerning the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company SKB’s license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden, began September 5, at Quality Hotel Nacka in Stockholm. The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC, and the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review, MKG, are working together during the main hearing. Follow and get updates during and after the main hearing from the Twitter account of the director of MKG, Johan Swahn, and MKG’s Facebook.

On September 5, the Environmental Court’s main hearing concerning the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company SKB’s license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden, began at Quality Hotel Nacka in Stockholm. The main hearing will be in progress for five weeks, between September 5 and October 27. The first two weeks take place in Stockholm. Then, there will be a break for two weeks. The third week will take place in Oskarhamn (were the interim storage Clab is located and were the Waste Company wants to build an encapsulation facility, Clink) and the fourth week will take place in Östhammar (nearby the selected site for the final repository). After another break for one week, the main hearing will be concluded in Stockholm.

The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC, and the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review, MKG, are working together during the main hearing. The organisations will bring their statements, which fundamentally are:

    • The chosen solution for a final repository will not be safe since there is a large risk of the malfunction of the barrier system of copper and clay – the licence application should be denied or rejected!

    • There is a large risk that the copper canisters will break down within 1 000 years – a possible scenario is that it might be a contaminated, uninhabitable, forbidden zone in Forsmark!
    • The Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, SSM, is aware of the large problems with the license application, but still wants to give an OK to continue towards a Government decision and afterwards ensure that the copper canister will function as intended – this is unaccepted and legal questionable!
    • There is an alternative method, the use of very deep boreholes – that might be environmentally safer, entails less risks for human intrusion, and is most likely a less expensive solution for final disposal!

    • The nature existing on the suggested site in Forsmark is of high value (there is a number of red-listed species and species protected by the Habitats Directive’s appendix 4) ­– this, in itself, constitutes a reason to reject the license application!

Follow and get updates during and after the main hearing at the director of MKG’s Twitter (@jswahn) and at MKG:s Facebook (mostly written in Swedish but can be translated directly on the website). Continue reading

September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Australia’s (?stupid) National Party wants: nuclear power, guns, and stop renewable energy

Nationals defend guns, nuclear and no money for renewables http://www.couriermail.com.au/news/queensland/queensland-government/nationals-defend-guns-nuclear-and-no-money-for-renewables/news-story/fccee1d11fd41d5138976df937ea4a3e,  Renee Viellaris, The Courier-Mail, September 9, 2017 TESTY Nationals will today demand governments get their hands off their guns, call for nuclear energy to be adopted and freeze subsidies for renewable energy.

September 9, 2017 Posted by | AUSTRALIA - NATIONAL, politics | Leave a comment

Urgent need for women’s participation in climate action decisions

Too much mansplaining in climate conversations? http://www.nationalobserver.com/2017/09/07/news/too-much-mansplaining-climate-conversations ,  September 7th 2017 #710 of 711 articles from the Special Report: Race Against Climate Change In the catastrophic 2004 Boxing Day Asian tsunami, four times more women died than men. In the worst affected village, Indonesia’s Kuala Cangkoy, 80 per cent of the victims were female, according to Oxfam International. The number was so disproportionate, reported the humanitarian agency, because men were generally fishing or away from home, and many were able to flee while women at home tried to save children.

It’s an imbalance that disturbs the World Meteorological Organization’s Elena Manaenkova, who addressed the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in Montreal earlier this week.

“Women couldn’t run because of their long clothes and they didn’t know how to swim,” she toldNational Observer in an interview.

The 56th session of the IPCC, which is tasked with providing sound climate science assessments to governments and policy makers, began in Montreal on Wednesday. At a closed-door workshop on Tuesday night however — held between the IPCC and Environment Canada — Manaenkova emphasized the importance of including more women in the world’s response to climate change.

She and a team of other climate experts are urging organizations and governments to recruit for women scientists to help improve sensitivity to gender issues in climate-related policy. Natural disasters, she explained, are just one example of how a warming world can have different impacts on women and men.

Women have to walk further for water

As temperatures rise and droughts become more frequent, for instance, women in some countries who are traditionally tasked with fetching water face more problems, including sexual violence.

According to the United Nations, women in Africa and Asia walk an average of six kilometres to get water but the distance can be much longer with droughts.

The delegate for Kenya, Patricia Nying’uro, has made note of that situation in her own country.

“If there’s a drought, (women) have to find water and in some areas they have to walk really far,” she said in an interview. “Even though everyone feels (climate change), these women feel it a bit more.”

As a senior meteorologist at the Kenyan Meteorological Department, she said whenever there are new seasonal forecasts for rain, they hold information forums and women are particularly interested.

“You will find that’s it’s mainly women who attend, one because they have the time and two, because they’re the most impacted,” she said.

To her, it’s important that more women participate in the climate change conversation because she feels not enough is being done to look at the impact on women.

“Women would be sensitive in general to things that happen to fellow women and the impacts on them,” she said.

In the catastrophic 2004 Boxing Day Asian tsunami, four times more women died than men.

 In the worst affected village, Indonesia’s Kuala Cangkoy, 80 per cent of the victims were female, according to Oxfam International. The number was so disproportionate, reported the humanitarian agency, because men were generally fishing or away from home, and many were able to flee while women at home tried to save children.

It’s an imbalance that disturbs the World Meteorological Organization’s Elena Manaenkova, who addressed the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in Montreal earlier this week.

“Women couldn’t run because of their long clothes and they didn’t know how to swim,” she toldNational Observer in an interview.

The 56th session of the IPCC, which is tasked with providing sound climate science assessments to governments and policy makers, began in Montreal on Wednesday. At a closed-door workshop on Tuesday night however — held between the IPCC and Environment Canada — Manaenkova emphasized the importance of including more women in the world’s response to climate change.

She and a team of other climate experts are urging organizations and governments to recruit for women scientists to help improve sensitivity to gender issues in climate-related policy. Natural disasters, she explained, are just one example of how a warming world can have different impacts on women and men.

Women have to walk further for water

As temperatures rise and droughts become more frequent, for instance, women in some countries who are traditionally tasked with fetching water face more problems, including sexual violence. According to the United Nations, women in Africa and Asia walk an average of six kilometres to get water but the distance can be much longer with droughts.

The delegate for Kenya, Patricia Nying’uro, has made note of that situation in her own country.

“If there’s a drought, (women) have to find water and in some areas they have to walk really far,” she said in an interview. “Even though everyone feels (climate change), these women feel it a bit more.”

As a senior meteorologist at the Kenyan Meteorological Department, she said whenever there are new seasonal forecasts for rain, they hold information forums and women are particularly interested.

“You will find that’s it’s mainly women who attend, one because they have the time and two, because they’re the most impacted,” she said.

To her, it’s important that more women participate in the climate change conversation because she feels not enough is being done to look at the impact on women.

“Women would be sensitive in general to things that happen to fellow women and the impacts on them,” she said.

IPCC aims to increase female participation

Manaenkova, the climate expert leading the World Meteorological Organization, shares Nying’uro’s position that more women experts need to participate in the conversation. During the gender workshop on Tuesday night, Manaenkova and other leaders working with IPCC gathered to discuss the situation and see how more women scientists could be included in IPCC’s work.

As a major organization assessing climate change to guide scientists and policy makers, the IPCC is trying to be more gender balanced, said Fatima Driouech, who spoke at the evening meeting. She is vice-chair of the IPCC Working Group 1, which deals with the physical science basis of climate change.

 “Within IPCC, there’s good will to improve (gender balance) for the future. In this cycle, we feel there’s an improvement compared to the previous one,” Driouech told National Observer.

The Moroccan scientist is one of 10 women of the IPCC’s 34-member bureau, which includes chairs and vice-chairs of the organization and its working groups and task force. She was also a lead author of the IPCC’s previous climate change assessment report.

“It’s important to include (women) in climate research and in science because there’s a need for different viewpoints, different visions and different ideas,” she said.

According to numbers released at the workshop and confirmed by IPCC, there are more female authors of special reports currently in the works than in previous years. The IPCC is nearly 30 years old, and was first established by the United Nations and the World Meteorological Organization to “provide a scientific basis for governments at all levels to develop climate-related policies.”

Thirty-eight per cent of the 86 authors of the Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 per cent — scheduled for publication next year — are women, compared with 21.5 per cent of 1,001 authors who participated in the IPCC’s fifth Assessment Report released in 2014. In a subreport of the fifth Assessment Report, all 33 authors from African countries were men.

In two other reports underway that are due in 2019, just under a third of the authors are women. That’s out of 101 authors for a report on climate change and oceans, the Special Report on the Ocean and Cryosphere in a Changing Climate, and 103 authors for the Special Report on Climate Change and Land.

While there’s some global improvement, Driouech said some countries are still struggling to be more gender-balanced: “There are some regions where there’s a little imbalance to fix for everyone’s good.”

For that reason, at the opening of the IPCC session on Wednesday morning, where representatives of member countries were present, Manaenkova mentioned the need for “active debate on the gender sensitivity of the issues” reflected in the IPCC reports.

Despite growing understanding that gender balance can inform better research and decision-making in climate science, she said organizations like the World Meteorological Organization, as well as the IPCC and other UN bodies, have had to put a lot of effort to convince “skeptics” who didn’t understand why more women need to be included. That persuasion effort is still underway.

Countries must nominate more women scientists

At IPCC, she said, some countries do not nominate enough women scientists to be authors.

“In some cases, (IPCC) has to positively discriminate, they prefer a woman to maybe ten men because she was the only one nominated,” she said.

At her own organization, she said they are thinking about enforcing nominations of women. As it stands, female nominations are encouraged and welcomed, rather than enforced.

Manaenkova believes that because IPCC focuses not just on physical climate change, but also socio-economic impacts and adaptation, it is even more important to have input from women. She said it would even be better to have reports with statistics separated by gender.

“(IPCC) says there’s some women nominated who could be lead authors and their competence is very high, and high enough to be coordinating author,” said Manaenkova. “We need to look for these women, find them, and pull them in.”

The IPCC will be in Montreal until Sunday to discuss their reports on the impacts of global warming, and to develop the outline for their main and sixth publication on the topic, which scheduled for release in 2022.

September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

Nuclear weapons ban: need to resolve disagreements about international security 

A stimulating and worthwhile article. It raises questions on how to address the reasons why States rely on nuclear weapons, and therefore be able to move them to reduce this reliance, without giving moral or legal legitimacy to nuclear deterrence.
Including international security in future disarmament conversations is the next step to making disarmament a commonly shared goal, rather than a divisive and politically fueled controversy.

Disarmament divided: resolving disagreements about international security http://thebulletin.org/disarmament-divided-resolving-disagreements-about-international-security11054  5 SEPTEMBER 2017 Jessica Margolis,  In the eight weeks since the historic vote to approve a United Nations treaty formally prohibiting nuclear weapons, attention has turned from treaty negotiations to the ban’s future impact. In anticipation of the treaty opening for signature on September 20, both advocates and opponents have been speculating about what comes next. Much of the discussion has focused on ensuring that delegations sign and ratify the treaty, determining how the prohibition will fit into existing nonproliferation regimes, and debating whether nuclear weapon states can or should participate in these next steps. However, little has been said about resolving underlying disagreements regarding international security concerns in the disarmament process. Continue reading

September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment

 Ignore looming climate change at your peril

 Chris McGirr, Bathurst, Western Advocate, 8 Sept 17   WIDESPREAD research indicates that 2017 is the cut-off point for preventing runaway climate change. Carbon emissions are required to be ground to a halt by the end of this year if we wish for our planet to remain safely habitable into the future. This clearly won’t happen.

The majority of the rest of the world are implementing strategies to mitigate the effects of climate change.

Australia is currently the world’s highest carbon emitter per capita; the world leader in destructive practices and ignorant policies, with NSW being the most profligate offender. Bathurst has clearly taken a ‘gloves off’ approach to the future, daring it with macho bravado to ‘do its worst’.

The majority of government websites worldwide have information regarding pending climate change threats, regardless of the fact they won’t tell you this to your face.

The Bathurst region is predicted to experience an extra 30 days of extreme heat per annum. Rainfall will become even less reliable, and extreme weather events more common. Population displacement from coastal and remote areas will be headed our way.

 Any person holding or seeking to hold public office who is not considering these outcomes is negligent, and will be responsible for the failure of this region to adapt and to become a morally responsible and sustainable city.

For centuries it was widely accepted that the merchant class should not be allowed to hold the reins of power due to their obvious self-serving, profit-driven motives. These rules were eroded, and the Great Depression happened. Rules were reinstated, things improved. The rules were eroded again – the Global Financial Crisis happened. ….he Great Inland Penrith that Bathurst has become over the past few years will not have a sustainable future given its current trajectory. Now is our only chance to get it right.

The next 50 years will see the environmental conditions of our region transform so dramatically that we can’t wait.

We have a federal member voting away our right to a fair rate of pay; a state member staring forlornly at what may perhaps one day possibly become an extra parking spot; and local representatives burying their heads in the potholes. Governments and corporations worldwide are preparing. Why aren’t we?

Intelligence and vision are required here like never before.

I am not a member of, or affiliated with, any political party. http://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/4911913/letter-ignore-looming-climate-change-at-your-peril/

September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | 7 Comments

Global warming has helped turn the hurricanes into even more destructive forces

Hurricane Irma, like Hurricane Harvey, was not caused by climate change. But the horrifying destruction it has sent across the Atlantic might have been.

Scientists say that asking whether global warming was the reason for the extreme weather is the wrong question. Instead, we should be focusing on how global warming has helped turn the hurricanes into even more destructive forces than they ever would have been before.
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/irma-climate-change-what-cause-hurricane-global-warming-caribbean-florida-a7933721.html

September 9, 2017 Posted by | General News | Leave a comment